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Database abstraction and RMI vs. multi-threaded Socket server

 
Jeff Caswell
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In studying for this test, I see Sun wants to understand when and how to connect to a database and how to design the classes to abstract it.
What is the standard pattern for doing this?
What is the benefit of RMI over your own multi-threaded socket server?
What is the benefit of sockets over RMI?
How do you design a multi-threaded RMI server?
These concepts are critical in many situations and my study book doesn't do a good job explaining them. Any help would be appreciated!
Thx.
 
Corey McGlone
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It looks to me as if you're studying for the Developer's Certification as RMI is most definitely NOT an objective for the Programmer's Certification.
I'll move this to the developer's cert forum.
Corey
 
Andrew Monkhouse
author and jackaroo
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Hi Jeff,
Nearly everyone here seems to be going with RMI. I did consider sockets (my reasoning being that it allows more flexibility if they decide to connect to a non Java database in the future - however on further thought this reasoning was negated by the fact that if we use sockets we have to serialization, so the code becomes Java specific even if you do use sockets), so even I am on the RMI bandwagon now.
I suggest that you do a search in this forum for either RMI and Sockets in the title, or RMI and Serialization in the title. You will find lots of posts that will give you reasons for using RMI.
This is but one example:
RMI vs. Sockets
Regards, Andrew
 
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