• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Submission Questions

 
Renato Mascardo
Greenhorn
Posts: 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello All,
I'm about to submit my assignment and I'm am going to have a 'master' archive with the following directory structure:
FBNApplication\client --> client jar
FBNApplication\client\doc --> user doc for app
FBNApplication\server --> server jar
FBNApplication\server\doc --> user doc for app
FBNApplication\sourceCode --> source code
FBNApplication\documentation\DesignChoices --> design doc
FBNApplication\documentation\JavaDoc --> javaDoc
FBNApplication\documentation\JavaDocUML --> JavaDoc with UML
FBNApplication\documentation\UserDocumentation --> User doc
FBNApplication\readme.txt
The first part of the the readme.txt outlines how to 'unzip' the master archive. Does this directory structure make sense? And do you think it would be best to archive the files in the JavaDoc and src directories? I know that I will be archiving the application but how about the other files required for submission?
Thanks!
-rjm
 
Andrew Monkhouse
author and jackaroo
Marshal Commander
Pie
Posts: 12007
215
C++ Firefox Browser IntelliJ IDE Java Mac Oracle
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Renato,
The first part of the the readme.txt outlines how to 'unzip' the master archive.

Ummm, don't they have to unzip the master archive in order to read the file telling them how to unzip the master archive?
Does this directory structure make sense?

Makes sense to me.
I did not have the root directory "FBNApplication" in my master archive (everything just unziped into the current directory and sub directories from there), but otherwise we have similar directory structures.
And do you think it would be best to archive the files in the JavaDoc and src directories? I know that I will be archiving the application but how about the other files required for submission?

I didn't. To be honest I don't see the point, given that the examiner is going to have to look at these files anyway.
If you only intended your user documentation to be used as online documentation, then it could make sense to put it in a jar file, and then have your application read the files from the jar file. This could be good for a deliverable to a real customer: from their perspective they will only see 3 or 4 jar files being delivered, rather than the 'x' number of user documentation files. And it is easier to replace just that one jar file if you need to update the documentation.
But for this assignment I didn't bother. I actually put in my documentation that having them as separate files was a benefit since the user could read the files using their favourite browser rather than being forced to start my application to read the documentation.
Likewise in a real life deliverable, If you think your end user needs to have a copy of the source files, but is unlikely to ever look at them, then it makes sense to have them in their own jar file - less clutter for the user. But in this case we know the examiner is going to look at our source files, so why give them an extra (unnecessary) job to do?
Regards, Andrew
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic