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Extern Keyword?  RSS feed

 
alpa urja
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Hi,
Is Extern ,a keyword in java...
If,yes pl.give an example which uses extern in java
Thanks in advance

alpa-urja
 
Latha Kalaga
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Hi! Alpa
Extern is not a keyword in java.
Latha
 
alpa urja
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Thanks Latha
but in one of the sites(I don't remember the site name),they mentioned Extern as a keyword in JAVA......
alpa-urja
 
naveen sahu
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Originally posted by alpa urja:
Thanks Latha
but in one of the sites(I don't remember the site name),they mentioned Extern as a keyword in JAVA......
<pre> that is dut to alpa-gyan </pre>
alpa-urja

 
Paul Ralph
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Extern is a keyword in C++, not Java. Here's an except (I hope this isn't illegal) from Thinking in C++ by Bruce Eckel. If you want to get the rest of the book, go to www.eckelobjects.com and follow the links to the download sites.
(Beginning of excerpt)
Variable declaration syntax
The meaning attributed to the phrase �variable declaration� has historically been confusing and contradictory, and it�s important that you understand the correct definition so you can read code properly. A variable declaration tells the compiler what a variable looks like. It says, �I know you haven�t seen this name before, but I promise it exists someplace, and it�s a variable of X type.�

In a function declaration, you give a type (the return value), the function name, the argument list, and a semicolon. That�s enough for the compiler to figure out that it�s a declaration and what the function should look like. By inference, a variable declaration might be a type followed by a name. For example:

int a;
could declare the variable a as an integer, using the logic above. Here�s the conflict: there is enough information in the code above for the compiler to create space for an integer called a, and that�s what happens. To resolve this dilemma, a keyword was necessary for C and C++ to say �This is only a declaration; it�s defined elsewhere.� The keyword is extern. It can mean the definition is external to the file, or that the definition occurs later in the file.

Declaring a variable without defining it means using the extern keyword before a description of the variable, like this:

extern int a;
extern can also apply to function declarations. For func1( ), it looks like this:

extern int func1(int length, int width);
This statement is equivalent to the previous func1( ) declarations. Since there is no function body, the compiler must treat it as a function declaration rather than a function definition. The extern keyword is thus superfluous and optional for function declarations. It is probably unfortunate that the designers of C did not require the use of extern for function declarations; it would have been more consistent and less confusing (but would have required more typing, which probably explains the decision).

Here are some more examples of declarations:

In the function declarations, the argument identifiers are optional. In the definitions, they are required (the identifiers are required only in C, not C++).
(End of excerpt)
HTH
Paul R
[This message has been edited by Paul Ralph (edited December 29, 2000).]
[This message has been edited by Paul Ralph (edited December 29, 2000).]
 
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