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Formula1

 
mohit joshi
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those who keep up with formula1, must have noticed the kind of technical problems that Mclaren have faced this year, and as a result they have to fight hard for 2nd place, as compared to a couple of years back when they had the best car.
How does this relates to Java performance. Well I just checked out their web site and it seems that Sun has been their software provider for a very long time. Sun has also used Java technology to develop software used to collect data during the race etc. I am not sure if the traction control software etc. has also been written in Java..
Well, One reason why people prefer Java is that the code is maintainable. So assuming that the code doesnt have bugs, why is Mclaren facing so many software problems, which has resulted in a possible retirement of one ex-champion and "brain-fade" conditions for the other Mclaren driver..
Any views..
 
Bob Dobalina
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I haven't logged on in quite some time, so I just saw your post. I'm a big F1 fan and a big McLaren fan, and I find it interesting that McLaren uses Sun software for their telemetry. I'd be surprised if Java were actually what was running their launch control/engine maintenance package, but hey... could be.
Anyway, you can't blame the programming language for failures in the software. Most programs written in Java deal with a rather stringent set of inputs... like a String from a user or a click of the mouse, etc. This makes them easy to test. Imagine trying to write a program to calculate engine spark on an 18,000 rpm engine, with inputs like tire wear, ambient temperature, track temperature, vehicle weight, clutch wear, etc. etc. etc...
The code may work perfectly well in all tested situations, but there's no way that you can generate "test cases" for all F1 situations that you'll see during the course of a season. As time wears on they'll get the bugs out... in fact they seem to have done just that, and now it's Williams that need some help
-tim
 
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