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instance in a for loop - right /wrong/doesn't matter ?

 
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Out of curiousity:

What is the diff (if any) between this:

for (int x=0; x<1000; x++)
{
boolean flag=obj[x].getInfo();
}

and this:

boolean flag;
for (int x=0; x<1000; x++)
{
flag=obj[x].getInfo();
}

Thanks for any help


 
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Regarding performance, none. It should compile to exactly the same byte code, as far as I know.
 
Peter Primrose
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what about memory usage?
 
author and iconoclast
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Local variables are stored in machine registers. As Ilja says, these will compile to identical code.
 
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Even if the local variable is on the stack instead of in a register (I'm not familiar with the JVM enough, but I assume it works the same as C/C++), variables in a loop are reused so there's really only one variable called flag.

The only difference here is that flag isn't available outside of the first loop. That being said, I strive to make variables have the smallest scope possible as it avoids name collisions and makes it clear that the variable isn't used outside the loop without having to read the rest of the method.
 
Peter Primrose
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so basically it is better to user the first option:
for (int x=0; x<1000; x++)
{
boolean flag=obj[x].getInfo();
}

because:
a. once it's out the loop the stack is free
b. collisions (can't use it outside the loop)

agree?
 
Ilja Preuss
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Agreed. Generally, your first order priority should be to express the intentions of the code as well as possible. Let the compiler care about optimizing execution - the modern ones are quite good at it. And once you really encounter a performance problem, you can work on it, with the knowledge that you are working on a real, concrete problem, and that your code is easy to understand and change - and therefore also easy to performance optimize.
 
David Harkness
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Originally posted by Peter Primrose:
a. once it's out the loop the stack is free

Agreed on all but this. Again, extrapolating from C/C++, the stack is only unrolled when the method returns -- not partially during the method execution. It's certainly possible to partially unroll the stack after the loop, but I doubt the JVM does this (and you wouldn't count on it anyway since it's not part of the specification) since it adds complexity for little gain.

I do believe, however, that if you had another loop with a boolean variable inside it, the JVM would reuse the same space in the stack for both variables since they aren't used at the same time. Again, this is another optimization left up to the compiler or JVM.

Ilja's advice takes precedence above all that: write clear code that expresses your intentions first.
 
Ilja Preuss
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David, you are right. Of course, depending on the architecture the program runs on, it might not make use of the stack at all - it might just use a register in this case, for example.
 
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