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Using JMX  RSS feed

 
Alex Teslin
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Hi, I am trying to use JMX to monitor my application's performance but had no luck. I quickly checked downloading and installing sub-section of Java Management Extensions by J.Steven Perry and he suggests that before using it you need to download first.

On Sun site, there is nothing about downloading, it says that jdk1.5 comes with it.

Does anyone know, what do i need to do before i can use it.

Thank you
 
Henry Wong
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There is no magic with JMX. You don't just install the JMX libraries, and then have full management access to monitor and manage the system. JMX only enables, it doesn't perform the magic... meaning...

With JMX, you can create an mbean server. An mbean server purpose is to be a container for mbeans. It is the mbeans that monitor and manage the system. If you use the MBeanServerFactory to create a MBean server, you'll just create an empty mbean container.

So where is the magic?

With Weblogic, JBoss, Websphere, Tomcat, etc., the application server will create a mbean server. It will then load it with mbeans. In many cases, hundreds of mbeans -- used to monitor and management every servlet, ejb, jdbc connection, user connection, etc. running in the server. It then provides access to this mbean server -- which could be through JNDI, or through a JMX connector, (for the RMI connector, both), or through a factory class (which generally goes through JNDI)

For Java 5, the JVM will also create an mbean server. It will also load it with many many mbeans (a whole 5 or 6 ). You can't access this mbean server via JNDI or via a connector, you'll have to access it through the ManagementFactory class.

Hope this helps,
Henry
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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