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New with RMI

 
Leslie Chaim
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Hello,
I am looking for a practical book covering RMI.
From the glimpse that I had so far I understand that some setup is needed for RMI to work. Currently, we are not using RMI in our shop. So I need a book that covers setup issues.
Finally, and this is my main goal why I am delving to RMI... and, a YES/NO question, for now
I want my application which involves Threads and Databases that the classes which are instantiated on the remote boxes and create their threads to communicate with wait/notify from my app. In other words, does RMI work well in conjunctions with threads?
[ September 05, 2002: Message edited by: Leslie Chaim ]
 
Mag Hoehme
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Hi Leslie,
I can recommend William Grosso's java RMI from O'Reilly: easy to read and understand; a lot of good examples in it.
I hope that helps.
 
Leslie Chaim
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I see that yesterday Michael has put his tutorial up to the top.
I just wanted to say that it is really great and it certainly makes up for any gaps from the Sybex book We all like interactive learning and indeed it is
Does anyone know what happened to the sidebar threads that were to be accompanied with Michael's tutorial? Did it ever happen?
After sifting through the reviews on Amazon, the java.rmi book by Pitt seemed to be better. I am wondering if there is anyone who has read it AND the JAVA RMI book by O'Reilly. How do they compare?
I was also hoping anyone who can address my initial question.
Thanks,
Leslie
[ September 19, 2002: Message edited by: Leslie Chaim ]
 
Michael Ernest
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Hi Leslie -
I have been meaning to supplement this tutorial time and again, but I have been getting pulled this year in more than a few directions, and so unable to focus.
There's a lot more I want to do with this tutorial -- sadly, I get very few chances to teach on topic these days, so it's hard to leverage my day-time work with night-time posts, etc.
As luck would have it, I'm teaching an EJB class to a number of people relatively new to RMI. I'm also away from home so my evenings are free and I can make some progress.
The Pitt book is awesome. Once I read it, I didn't even look at the O'Reilly book. My search was over.
 
Leslie Chaim
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Originally posted by Michael Ernest:

The Pitt book is awesome. Once I read it, I didn't even look at the O'Reilly book. My search was over.

Update, so I got the Pitt book and indeed it is awesome, but for those reading this subject titled New with RMI here is some advice:
"If you really want to understand the Pitt book get the O'Reilly book first "
Unless you are a Sheriff . :roll: :roll:
I am in the middle of doing just that, and I am up to chapter 5. It really starts from the ground up, taking about streams and sockets in chapter 1-2. Followed by the first distributed application using sockets in chapter 3. Then, chapter 4 has that very same application in RMI.
The best thing of the book is the extra focus on design issues. The author goes through great lengths explain terminology best practices and the rest.
The biggest gripe I have so far is the lack of complete examples. There is lots of code that are omitted, for the purpose of clarity, but I feel that it is too fragmented.
Then again, maybe the author felt that 572 pages for a book was enough.
So that's it for my book review, thank you all for your advice.
One topic I would like to discuss, perhaps that should be a new post, RMI vs. sockets
Right now, I am more comfortable with sockets then I am with RMI. Now, I have this application that has to be distributed. I estimate it would take me 2-3 weeks to get it done.
Question, given that I am pressed for time: should I go ahead and use sockets since I am more comfortable with it, or should I delve further into RMI, a task that would take another 2 weeks, and code my app with RMI?
 
Michael Ernest
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More no-help:
If you can do what needs doing with sockets alone, and your production environment cares little how the goal is achieved and time is of the essence, I'd say go with what you know.
To add in a layer of uncertainty, in the form of a new approach, always has risks. It helps to have a compelling need to use something new (to the environment in question, anyway), and a bit of shared willingness to take a risk.
I recommended a RPC solution to a client a week ago, and they looked at me pretty funny. I told them I could do what they wanted in RMI (and the vigorous nodding started) for about twice the cost (and they all cocked their heads like puppies will when you speak Klingon to them). More importantly, I told them "RMI is cool, but it's not what you need. I can do what you need for $X. I can do what you want for a lot more, because you'll pay more for cool stuff than you will for necessities."
They're still absorbing that message, but get this: they hired another guy to do their thing in RMI and are paying him even more than I asked for, so I couldn't have been that wrong.
 
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