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ssachu
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Hi all ,
Need expert comments!
i have to define architecture for one of my project .
oracle database distributed geographically .
requirement is to access these distributed db on WAN and process data for generating report for user .
q: do i need to consider one weblogic server in each station
q: rmi iiop is better or Soap on http is better ?
q: RMI is possible ?
performance and database access will be a bottleneck if architecture not defined well .
so pls share ur ideas and experiences and documents !!
many thanks
sachit :roll:
 
Alex Pisarev
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Originally posted by ssachu:
Hi all ,
Need expert comments!
i have to define architecture for one of my project .
oracle database distributed geographically .
requirement is to access these distributed db on WAN and process data for generating report for user .
q: do i need to consider one weblogic server in each station
q: rmi iiop is better or Soap on http is better ?
q: RMI is possible ?
performance and database access will be a bottleneck if architecture not defined well .
so pls share ur ideas and experiences and documents !!
many thanks
sachit :roll:

Hi, Sachit!
Firstly, I don't have a clear picture upon organization of your WAN network. I don't see any need for an expensive Weblogic server in every location - I think that Weblogic is needed only at the central location and it could be used for actual processing of the data you received from the remote locations.
If you have HTTP protocol as the only mean of for communication between your sites, you have the following options:
1. Servlet container (i.e. Tomcat) using servlets to access the database data via JDBC and sending the database data back in XML format - slow and inefficient way, the use of Web Services would be a better alternative.
2. Apache Axis Web Services server (or any other) that provides Web Services to access database through JDBC. More elegant solution than the first one, however, still too slow and time-consuming in comparison with IIOP/JRMP solutions described below.
In case, if you have an opportunity to use JRMP or IIOP you have the following options here:
1. JavaIDL CORBA applications on a remote locations that communicate with database via JDBC and are accessible through IIOP.
2. RMI/JRMP Java applications on a remote locations communicating with database via JDBC and are accessible through JRMP.
3. RMI/IIOP Java applications on a client side communications with database via RMI and are accessible via IIOP.
4. Direct access to your remote databases via JDBC from central location via database protocols.
If you plan to stick with Java all the time, I think option number 2 could be the best and faster solution for you. However, it will require more coding that option 3, so it could be more time consuming and expensive.
You could use option 1 if your application would require some of the features that IIOP has over JRMP or you're planning to switch from Java to something else (i.e. because of performance considerations) in the near future - so it's the most extensible/maintainable option.
You would require an application server on a remote locations to use option 3, but you can use free JBoss in that case. This will be the most effective option - you'll get a chance to make anything you want without pretty much headache. In that case you'll be able to develop the most extensible, maintainable, secure and fast solution. However, it could require some additional time time to develop it - but you'll never regret, believe me.
Option number 4 will require additional security expenses and is an example of tight coupling that is no good for a good n-tier application. However, it's one of the most straighforward and cheap options you can afford, plus you will become more dependable on your database implementation than in the options mentioned above.
Alternatively, you could directly retreive the information from your database via HTTP protocol in XML format (Oracle supports that) - the same as a previous option, but more slower.
I afraid, that the best decision could be made only after detailed reviewal of your system's WAN infrastructure, after receiving the information about nature, structure, volume of the data your will retreive from the database, your project budget, the team you have and many other criterias. It's impossible to make such a decisions without all that information.
Alex
 
ssachu
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Hi Alex ,
I want to thanx to you for your in depth comments/suggetion and pain you have taken for me.
This information is really useful for all architects.
if i have more queries i will get back to you.
 
Michael Ernest
High Plains Drifter
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"ssachu"
Please change your name to conform to JavaRanch's naming policy.
Thanks.
 
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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So I'm glancing at the list of current threads on the saloon home page and one catches my eye... "Distributed Architecture" - Michael Ernest. "Michael has some comments on distributed architecture! I have to read this!" And what do I find? :roll:
Originally posted by Michael Ernest:
"ssachu"
Please change your name to conform to JavaRanch's naming policy.
Thanks.


[ September 17, 2002: Message edited by: Thomas Paul ]
 
Michael Ernest
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It's no accident I waited a week to post on naming policy. I wanted no part of this topic in a bb format...
 
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