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Why not distributed OS  RSS feed

 
giang nguyen
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We have to struggle with distribution at application level deloploying our EJBs on different machines and the application server is reponsible for coodinating those stuffs. I just think that why there isn't an OS that can handle distributed computing instead of the application server. That OS can take care of several machines, decide which to use for a particular task and handle load balancing. If we have such an OS, we can deploy multiple J2EE components at one place, on one Application server and the OS will take care the rest for us, no needs to worry about distributing those components and load-balancing.
Is this what grid computing tries to achieve ?
Your idea ?
 
Michael Ernest
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A grid system is designed to parcel out heavy computational work into subtasks that can be assigned to a group of individual systems.
There are relatively few advantages to running a single operating system over multiple machines. Distributed computing takes a while to understand if you're coming from a workstation perspective, but in the long run it is much less expensive to write relationships between physical systems than it is to yoke them together.
 
Vladas Razas
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My 2 cents. I believe business development and application development (that is not OS utils or something) must be OS independent! That's why I chose Java to .NET (even though my first certificate was on .NET). The next step I would do is Unified User Interfaces. That is customizable OS UI but ready to use on any OS: Unix, Linux, Windows etc. Because after all 95% users dont care who implements services, protocols and other OS stuff for them. They not really want to know which OS they use. And they use Windows mostly just because everyone is familiar with Windows UI
 
Michael Ernest
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Originally posted by Vladas R.:
The next step I would do is Unified User Interfaces. That is customizable OS UI but ready to use on any OS: Unix, Linux, Windows etc. Because after all 95% users dont care who implements services, protocols and other OS stuff for them. They not really want to know which OS they use. And they use Windows mostly just because everyone is familiar with Windows UI

There have been fits and starts in this direction for a long time.
Among major Unix vendors there was a stab at implementing COSE (Common Operating System Environment), a standard based in Motif and dedicated to the proposition that all windowing systems (in Unix, at least) should work the same way.
It was thought for a short time that SGML-derived browser interfaces might generalize the UI to a common environment. The big catch: markets. Companies wanted to own this space, and the hearts-and-minds war took its toll very quickly on the idea of a common browser environment. More importantly, the industry re-learned an old truth. There is no one application that satisfies all people. Not even UI design.
Plus you have emerging standards that tackle this same problem in its own way. There is, for example, GNOME, a Motif-based windowing system which to some degree emulates a Windows-like environment, that was popularized by the growing interest in Linux. That system introduces its own bias of values based on its most avid users and their projection of what the rest of the user community wants.
Of course we have attempts at common UI abstractions, such as Swing, but even at this level, you find that people have to create their own visual icons to differentiate the objects a user is supposed to manipulate in an application. End result? Every new Swing UI you see has its own visual voacbulary, and you still have to learn that unless you're content to run anything and everything through a menu-based pick system.
Unified Interfaces are an interesting concept, but I don't think the intended aim -- everybody looking at essentially the same kinds of things regardless of local preferences, much less the operating platform itself -- can be achieved.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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