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diffrence between SOAP and RMI  RSS feed

 
bipul.kumar@azikewe.com
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hello friends
i need some help in finding out how SOAP is better choice then RMI
kindly help
bipul.kumar@azikewe.com
 
Andrew Monkhouse
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Hi Bipul,
Welcome to JavaRanch. We don't have many rules here, but one we do have is the JavaRanch Naming Policy. We require you to have a first name and a last name as your displayed name (no email addresses), and the displayed name should be your real name. Could you please update your displayed name to meet this policy? You can change your displayed name here.
The SCJD forum is for discussions on the Sun Certified Java Developer assignment and exam. There is no need for SOAP in the SCJD assignment, and so this question does not really fit in this forum. The contributor's to the Web Services forum may be able to give you a better idea of SOAP, but I don't think that a comparison with RMI would be appropriate there. A better place for your question would be the Distributed Java forum. I have therefore moved this thread here.
Regards, Andrew
 
Stan James
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RMI is well named - Remote Method Invocation. It allows Java-to-Java remote method calls. A nice thing for sure.
SOAP is badly named. It is not simple, not object oriented, not an access method and arguably not a protocol. But it is highly interoperable. You can provide SOAP services or call SOAP services using just about any language, OS, platform, etc. I call it the lowest common denominator. Common because so many diverse platforms can use it, but low because XML involves a lot of expensive string handling for composition and parsing, XML is a fat payload, HTTP is not your fastest protocol choice (of course SOAP can be done over others, but HTTP is most common). I think the common makes the low worth while when you value interoperability.
Hope that helps you compare the two
 
Vinod Chandana
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Just to add to what james said. SOAP is not really scalable.
Regards,
Vinod.
[ December 11, 2003: Message edited by: Vinod Chandana ]
 
Vinod Chandana
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Originally posted by Vinod Chandana:
Just to add what james said. SOAP is not really scalable.
Regards,
Vinod.
 
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