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Access to remote memory spaces...  RSS feed

 
Bryan Noll
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Hello all, I'd appreciate it a bunch if you could steer me in the right direction. Let me list the kind of tasks I would like to accomplish. JBoss will be serving the J2EE app we're developing...the architecture will be heavily endowed with Scheduling (probably Quartz) and Workflow (probably JPBM) pieces.

Primarily, I would think that the J2EE server will need access to the memory space of several different windows boxes for the following reasons:
1) The ability to invoke an .exe from the command line for a 3rd party windows app. (And secondarily, to interrogate a MySQL DB located on the same box, which gets updated as a result of the .exe being run.)
2) The ability to interrogate the tables of a 3rd party Microsoft Access mdb (please don't tell me how horrible this is, I already know and wish I didn't have to do it) on numerous user machines.

I'm thinking something in the way of some service running on these Windows machines able to listen to requests made by the J2EE server. Any suggestions?

Please let me know if you think this post would receive a better response in a different forum.

Thanks in advance.
 
William Brogden
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That is certainly do-able, and I think you are in the right place. Thare are lots of levels of complexity you could tackle this with so you need to try to refine the requirements a bit. Let me just throw out some questions:
1. How often does the access have to be?
2. How quick does it have to be? (millisec, seconds, minutes, hours?)
3. How structured is the network? Are these machines there all the time or can they drop off and be added irregularly.
4. Where do the changes in the data propagate from?
Bill
 
Bryan Noll
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Thanks for the response Bill. Let me take a stab at your questions.

1) Frequency of access: at the most, I'll say a dozen attempts per hour.

2) How quick? Assuming its a reasonable figure, I would say no more than 10-20 seconds per access attempt.

3) Network stability: A couple different scenarios.
a) The Windows machine housing the app that needs to be invoked with a command line executable call is stable. It serves as a crude physical server, so it won't go away until some operations guy works with an app support guy to transition the applications to another location.
b) The Windows boxes running and housing the MSAcess .mdb's are end-user machines. So...those would clearly be less stable.

4) Changes in data...what makes them happen? In either case, an end user of the system we're developing can perform some action that will in turn need to make data be inserted or updated in one of the two scenarios. The MySQL DB will also get updated with scheduled jobs.


I really appreciate the help. Please let me know if I can clear anything else up for you.

[ May 18, 2004: Message edited by: Bryan Noll ]
[ May 18, 2004: Message edited by: Bryan Noll ]
 
Bryan Noll
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Has anyone worked with this JBoss service? Is it worth pursuing?


jmx-invoker-adaptor-server.sar � provide remote access to the JMX MBean server.
 
William Brogden
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With those parameters, I think JMS - Java Message Service would work for communication - especially since you could use Message Driven Beans on the J2EE end and JMS is part of J2EE these days.

On the client side I guess you would need Java applications (eventually installed as a service), they could register with the JMS server when they come on line and wait for requests. This kind of background Java process might take up 10-20 MB - pretty compact in modern hardware.

Bill
 
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