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Alternatives to JSF

 
Jitender Kumar
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What are the alternatives to JSF for building webbased rich clients?

Are there any articles/white papers available on web about the positives, performance issues, etc.. in using JSF?



Thanks in advance for the reply,
Jitender.
 
Gregg Bolinger
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Struts
WebWork (Struts Action2)
Shale (Struts-JSF)
SpringMVC
Wicket
Tapestry
Stripes
Flex
Open Laszlo

Just to name a few. Take some time and google all these. Doing so you'll also find many articles and blogs on the differences between them and compared to JSF if you search for things like "Struts vs JSF". Do a little homework. ;)
 
Jitender Kumar
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I appreciate your effort in listing out the alternatives for JSF and also your effort in spending time to suggest or advice me.

I am actually looking at developing rich web client with UI components embedded into my web application.

Please advice.


Thanks,
Jitender.
 
Bear Bibeault
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When it all comes down to it, it's just HTML, JavaScript and CSS in the browser.

There's no magic to any of these frameworks.
 
Gregg Bolinger
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Originally posted by Jitender Kumar:
I appreciate your effort in listing out the alternatives for JSF and also your effort in spending time to suggest or advice me.

I am actually looking at developing rich web client with UI components embedded into my web application.

Please advice.


Thanks,
Jitender.


Umm, advise what? Do some research of your own into these different frameworks, if you must use a framework, and make an educated choice based on your findings. If you have specific questions about any particular framework, ask them in the appropriate forum. Your question is too broad and oozes with laziness. ;)
 
Jitender Kumar
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Thanks Bear Bibeault.

I appreciate your response. I agree with that.


Thanks,
Jitender.
 
Inocencio Oliveira
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Try on Mentawai Framework, is very easy to undestand and get in practice!
 
ankur rathi
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Originally posted by Bear Bibeault:
When it all comes down to it, it's just HTML, JavaScript and CSS in the browser.

There's no magic to any of these frameworks.


 
Yegor Bugayenko
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Take a look at ReXSL, it's a much simplier than JSF and much more testable (when using rexsl-maven-plugin)
 
Tim Holloway
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Yegor Bugayenko wrote:Take a look at ReXSL, it's a much simplier than JSF and much more testable (when using rexsl-maven-plugin)


Actually, JSF was specifically designed to be testable. It's why the backing beans are POJOs, instead of extensions or implementations of framework-specific classes and interfaces. It's why POJO set/get methods are used to access backing bean data values (properties), and why action methods are simple parameterless POJO method calls. And it's why I spend so much time admonishing people to avoid writing to the framework when a simpler, more portable option is available.

A properly-designed JSF backing bean can be easily tested with bog-standard jUnit, either from Maven/Ant or from within an IDE such as Eclipse, and I do so daily. You don't need the trouble and overhead of setting up a server or mock-server to test, since the beans are POJOS, nor do you need specialized testing plugins.
 
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