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which one is best, jsf or swing  RSS feed

 
Nidhi Nagre
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hello experts,

although i have a good insight in swing and awt api's. today i have taken a look over JSF.
to develope a web application is it better to study JSF if i have knolowege of swing API's. i dont know wheather swing is having more features or JSF. i am not sure but i think we can handle event's in a and can decorate GUI components better than in jsf, right?

please remove my confusion that wheather should i study JSF or contiue with using features of swing components with servlet and jsp?

regards
san
 
Ulf Dittmer
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Swing is a desktop technology, not something you use for building web apps, so any comparison between JSF and Swing is not very useful. The only way to use Swing as part of web apps is if you put an applet on a web page. But I don't think that's what you're asking about.

Also note that there is rarely a "best" for anything. Plenty of options are available, some without doubt better suited for your needs than others. But without knowing what those are, the question of "best" can't be decided.
 
Nidhi Nagre
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Mr Ulf wrote:
The only way to use Swing as part of web apps is if you put an applet on a web page. But I don't think that's what you're asking about.


nope! that's what i'm asking for.

regards
san
[ December 29, 2007: Message edited by: Nidhi Nagre ]
 
Tim Holloway
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Ultimately, an applet can be more powerful for a GUI. Within the frame of the applet, you can control graphics down to the pixel level, and handle events not available to server-side code.

However, applets can't be run just anywhere. A lot of places (especially Windows shops) forbid installation of the client-side JVM needed to run an applet. And I do know people who are running 28KB connections to the Internet, even in this day and age. It would be downright abusive to force them to download a JVM unless there was a really compelling reason.

Server-side technologies such as JSF and Struts don't have that problem. If you have even a half-way competent web browser, those apps will work with no mods on the client.

My own gut feeling is that once you have a framework, you can develop faster for JSF. That's in large part because the constructs are more limited, and thus simpler. I don't have any scientific data on that, though.

About 2 years back I did a Swing applet. It was for company-internal app where I needed to be able to do flexible editing of data in tabular form. We discussed long and earnestly whether the support group would tolerate it and finally decided that the alternatives were too expensive in terms of time and resources.

These days, I probably would have done that particular app in AJAX, however. I'd enjoy that a lot less than Swing, but it would be more readily received.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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