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Hibernate Made Easy Question

 
Joe Harry
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Hi Cameron,

A couple of other questions that I have on the book are,

Do you compare Hibernate data access with a normal JDBC access and bring out the advantages thereby in using hibernate than plain old JDBC?

What version of Hibernate does the book cover?

Do you also talk about the Annotations in Hibernate?

Do you also talk about the JPA?
 
Paul Sturrock
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Most of these question have already been answered. It's always worth searching the forum before posting.
[ June 04, 2008: Message edited by: Paul Sturrock ]
 
Joe Harry
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Fine...but what about Annotations and a comparison of the CRUS operation using Hibernate and plain old JDBC!
 
Cameron Wallace McKenzie
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What version of Hibernate does the book cover?


Hibernate 3.2.6 is the core version the book covers, although there really isn't anything in the book that doesn't equally apply to 3.2.5 or for the most part, earlier versions.


Do you compare Hibernate data access with a normal JDBC access and bring out the advantages thereby in using hibernate than plain old JDBC?

Do you also talk about the Annotations in Hibernate?


The book is actually called "Hibernate Made Easy: Simplified Data Persistence with Hibernate and JPA Annotations," so, as that would imply, yes, the book focuses on using annotations.

My goal in writing this Hibernate book was to really focus on what the Hibernate book market needs. If you read the reviews on most of the popular Hibernate books out there, some of the common complaints are that the books try to cover too much, and that makes learning Hibernate difficult. Personally, I encountered the very same issue when I tried to learn Hibernate, despite the fact that I have a strong background in JDBC and EJBs.

So, I wanted this book to be very focussed, allowing people to pick it up, read through it, and learn Hibernate quickly and efficiently. As such, I focussed on JPA annotations, and didn't try to explain mapping files at the same time. Furthermore, I very intentionally stayed away from adding tutorials on how to use Spring or how to use JSF. I also didn't talk about other frameworks or direct JDBC. My thoughts are that anyone reading a book called Hibernate Made Easy needs to learn Hibernate, and doing sidebar discussion on JDBC or Toplink or Portlets would take away from the overall objective, and make learning more difficult, which would fly directly in the face of making Hibernate Easy.

The big thing about my Hibernate Book is that it really teaches people how Hibernate works, not just 'how to get Hibernate to do something.' As such, with that solid grounding in Hibernate technology, people gain the ability to make their own comparisons with other frameworks or strategies such as JDBC, and as such can make their own informed decisions about the various benefits and drawbacks.

Kindest regards,

-Cameron McKenzie
 
Joe Harry
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Originally posted by Cameron Wallace McKenzie:


The book is actually called "Hibernate Made Easy: Simplified Data Persistence with Hibernate and JPA Annotations," so, as that would imply, yes, the book focuses on using annotations.

My goal in writing this Hibernate book was to really focus on what the Hibernate book market needs. If you read the reviews on most of the popular Hibernate books out there, some of the common complaints are that the books try to cover too much, and that makes learning Hibernate difficult. Personally, I encountered the very same issue when I tried to learn Hibernate, despite the fact that I have a strong background in JDBC and EJBs.

So, I wanted this book to be very focussed, allowing people to pick it up, read through it, and learn Hibernate quickly and efficiently. As such, I focussed on JPA annotations, and didn't try to explain mapping files at the same time. Furthermore, I very intentionally stayed away from adding tutorials on how to use Spring or how to use JSF. I also didn't talk about other frameworks or direct JDBC. My thoughts are that anyone reading a book called Hibernate Made Easy needs to learn Hibernate, and doing sidebar discussion on JDBC or Toplink or Portlets would take away from the overall objective, and make learning more difficult, which would fly directly in the face of making Hibernate Easy.

The big thing about my Hibernate Book is that it really teaches people how Hibernate works, not just 'how to get Hibernate to do something.' As such, with that solid grounding in Hibernate technology, people gain the ability to make their own comparisons with other frameworks or strategies such as JDBC, and as such can make their own informed decisions about the various benefits and drawbacks.

Kindest regards,

-Cameron McKenzie


Thanks for the reply. You are right in what you said that through your book, you show how hibernate works apart from knowing how to work with Hibernate and I think that kind of focus is the need of the hour!
 
Billy Tsai
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how is this book different to the latest version of Hibernate In Action(Java Persistence With Hibernate), what are the special things and significant points about this book?
and does it cover the usage of the newest Hibernate features such as annotations with intergrating with another framework like Spring?
 
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