Win a copy of The Little Book of Impediments (e-book only) this week in the Agile and Other Processes forum!
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Brief Summary: Persistence in the Enterprise: A Guide to Persistence Technologies.

 
Jesus Angeles
Ranch Hand
Posts: 2068
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Authors of "Persistence in the Enterprise: A Guide to Persistence Technologies"!!

Can you give us an overview of what the book contains? In addition, can you mention how it relates to different java job roles?
 
Roland Barcia
author
Ranch Hand
Posts: 181
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This book gives guidance for the persistence layer of your enterprise applications. It gives you a template for choosing the right persistence framework, or for choosing when to use a particular feature. The first half of the book gives you details on architecture, requirements, design, and concerns. We give you a template for a persistent framework, and then give 5 examples (JDBC, IBatis, Hibernate, JPA, and pureQuery). We provide sample code as well.
 
Geoff Hambrick
author
Greenhorn
Posts: 22
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
While the book evaluates some specific technologies (JDBC, iBatis, Hibernate Core, Open JPA and PureQuery), it is intended to help various roles ask and understand the answers to questions of interest to them. For example, executives are going to know what the costs and benefits of a fraemwork are in terms of business drivers such as availability of skills, standards adherence, etc. Architects are going to want to weigh the impacts of the framework on the ability to meet functional and non functionak aspects of the applications. Programmers are going to want to know details of the programming model and tools.

The book has Chapters from these points of view, brought together into a template for evaluation in Chapter 4 used to evaluate the five frameworks in Chapters 5-9 and summarized in 10.

The idea is to help you understand the primary issues so that when the next framework comes up, you can use the same basic template to see whether it has brought something new to the table or is just a rehash...

Ok then, Geoff
 
Jesus Angeles
Ranch Hand
Posts: 2068
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Have you mentioned, if any, upcoming new age of persistence technologies, on top, or totally different from orm and jdbc? Are there alternatives to orm and jdbc currently?

Or to put it another way, are there other persistence technologies mentioned other than orm and jdbc (e.g. stored procedures)?
[ July 22, 2008: Message edited by: Jesus Angeles ]
 
Ravikiran Vishnuvajhala
Ranch Hand
Posts: 30
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Originally posted by Geoff Hambrick:
While the book evaluates some specific technologies (JDBC, iBatis, Hibernate Core, Open JPA and PureQuery), it is intended to help various roles ask and understand the answers to questions of interest to them. For example, executives are going to know what the costs and benefits of a fraemwork are in terms of business drivers such as availability of skills, standards adherence, etc.


Geoff,

One more question to this is - does it also list down the pros and cons of these frameworks, for example: performane, scalability, rapid application development, flexibility and maintainability etc?
 
Geoff Hambrick
author
Greenhorn
Posts: 22
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Originally posted by Jesus Angeles:
Have you mentioned, if any, upcoming new age of persistence technologies, on top, or totally different from orm and jdbc? Are there alternatives to orm and jdbc currently?

Or to put it another way, are there other persistence technologies mentioned other than orm and jdbc (e.g. stored procedures)?

[ July 22, 2008: Message edited by: Jesus Angeles ]


Yes. The reason we included PureQuery is that it represents a style similar to SQLJ where the calls to the database are directly included in the program code.

Ok then, Geoff
 
Geoff Hambrick
author
Greenhorn
Posts: 22
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Originally posted by Ravikiran Vishnuvajhala:


Geoff,

One more question to this is - does it also list down the pros and cons of these frameworks, for example: performane, scalability, rapid application development, flexibility and maintainability etc?


Yes. The questionnaire that we used for the evaluation template includes "non functional" aspects like the abilty to tune for performance, what kind of tooling is used to support development, how easy it is to maintain, etc.

Ok then, Geoff
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic