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quote from J.Gosling  RSS feed

 
ersin eser
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Microsoft is making aggressive moves on the Web services front. There's some talk that Java is trailing in the Web services game, since the Java supporters, through the Java Community Process, won't come up with a Web services standards until later this year. Your thoughts?
We get asked about slowness a lot. I've made the comment that democracies work slower than dictatorships. That's a true thing. One of the key aspects of Web services is that it's all about cooperation. So if you are building a standard airline reservation system you have to get Travelocity, Orbitz and Expedia into a room, and they have to agree on a common schema in the Extensible Markup Language (XML) world for describing what is a flight and what is a request for a flight. One could try to dictate to the airline industry what all their reservation systems should look like, but they would not be real happy about that. I don't think that would be successful, because Web services is inherently about cooperating, so there has to be some kind of democratic process.
When you try to get Visa, MasterCard, Citibank and American Express, and the list of people in the Liberty Alliance (to create a standard for an authentication service over the Web), getting them to agree is going to be hard. But they are actually committed to agreeing. They understand they have their own agendas, but to further their own personal agendas they have to cooperate. So they are actually doing some good work.

news.com
 
Paul Jenkins
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The world has already done all of this, it is called ASC-X12 EDI. Why reinvent the wheel? Why not just extend the X12 standards where they are lacking?
(sarcasm)
Oh, I know, because with SOAP/XML we can read the data transferred easier, yeah, that is a good idea...
(/sarcasm)
Seriously, someone answer why SOAP/XML is better than X12...
 
William Brogden
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The industry in general seems to have decided that EDI is too hard to use and not flexible enough. The "web services" vision calls for flexibility such that if you want to get a particular kind of data you use UDDI or ebXML to locate a service, WSDL to automatically create the classes required to access it, and SOAP to carry out the message exchange.
Non-SOAP messages - ie RosettaNet - were displacing EDI before SOAP came along because of the need for flexibility.
Please feel free to use whatever technique your particular problem requires.
Bill
 
Michael Piscatello
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It is interesting that Mr. Gosling would use the travel industry as an example. We have been working on a web services type of solution before web services was sexy. The standards have been written and we are writing code.
A funny thing happened when we were making software decisions for the project; someone suggested Biztalk. I never questioned using anything but java.
Check out http://www.opentravel.org
 
Doug Wang
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Originally posted by Paul Jenkins:
The world has already done all of this, it is called ASC-X12 EDI. Why reinvent the wheel? Why not just extend the X12 standards where they are lacking?
Seriously, someone answer why SOAP/XML is better than X12...

Hi, Paul
EDI is a proprietary data format, needs proprietary software tools, tranports accross proprietary network(ie. VAN), results in huge cost to implement(and it is difficult to extend it). So traditional EDI failed to create a broad based acceptance.
While EDI provides VAST experience of industries and trade between business. One of the sponsors of ebXML, UN/EDIFACT integrates the vast experience into ebXML. Because ebXML is based on the open data format(maybe should say data structure), XML, much less expensive and easier to implement, freely transport accross Internet, thus ebXML lowers the barrier of entry to electronic business, particularly with respect to SME.
It is ebXML or XML/EDI that is better than X12, one dialect of EDI. XML itself is better than EDI data format for processing, and XML gives us many thing beyond easily processing. SOAP, the XML message protocol, cannot find counter-part in EDI.

Doug :roll:
[ January 24, 2002: Message edited by: Doug Wang ]
 
Jim Baiter
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This company used HP web services back when they were called E-Speak then HP migrated to support SOAP & UDDI. It is a good example of web services in supply chain planning which really cannot occur without some sort of standardization. You can't deal with an arbitrary supply chain each supplier having its own proprietary format.
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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