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SOAP Document Style

 
JeanLouis Marechaux
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Hi all,
I'm back after a while out of the webservices world...
and I've got questions again and again.....
To exchange xml requests with Axis, would you consider using SOAP DOC/LIT or SOAP with SAAJ (I mean the XML doc as an attached file)
What are the differences (performance, industry-standard, etc..)
Thanks for your hints
 
Kyle Brown
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Doc-lit. It's more compatible with the WS-I basic profile and will probably prove more interoperable.
Kyle
 
Lasse Koskela
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Good to have you back, both of you
 
JeanLouis Marechaux
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Thanks guys.
You're conforting my opinion here so I'm glad :-)
Nevertheless, some argue Doc/Lit with a huge payload is not efficient (performance, always performance, what kind of world are we living in if we are always driven by the performance :roll: )
The same people argue in that case, SAAJ is the solution 'cause you can compress the attached file.
Does that make sense for you ?
Did you ever encounter performance problems with Axis-Doc-Lit WebServices ?
Btw, are you using Axis with Doc/Lit ?
 
Kyle Brown
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Yeah, I've heard that objection with Doc/Lit as opposed to SOAP with Attachments before too, but I don't think it holds water. After all, you're still going to have to parse it, right?
And believe it or not, you can compress the entire SOAP envelope too. Do a Google search -- I've had a few customers do this with either the Java ZIP libraries in a Servlet filter applied to the SOAP servlet or with Apache GZIP on the Web Server. Note that in both cases, the HTTP request and response is simply compressed upstream from the SOAP engine. They apparently found a way to decompress on the other end too, but that was done in .NET and I'm not as up on how that was accomplished (although .this reference looks useful.
Kyle
 
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