Win a copy of Testing JavaScript Applications this week in the HTML Pages with CSS and JavaScript forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Bear Bibeault
  • Ron McLeod
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Paul Clapham
Sheriffs:
  • Tim Cooke
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Junilu Lacar
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • fred rosenberger
  • salvin francis
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • Frits Walraven
  • Carey Brown

Axis vs. JWSDP?

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 511
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello again,

I am a Web services newbie...

Several questions:

1. What is the difference between Axis and JWSDP?

2. Does one require the other?

3. What is the best way to learn web services (good tutorials, URLs, or books)?

Many, many thanks!
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 238
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi

Even I am a newbie. Following is the link I think is best to learn web services.

http://java.sun.com/blueprints/guidelines/designing_webservices/html/
 
Bartender
Posts: 2968
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Originally posted by Unnsse Khan:
1. What is the difference between Axis and JWSDP?



They are different implementations of the Java Web services technologies.
They both have to deal with XML, SOAP, and WSDL and implement/use the JAXP, JAX-RPC and SAAJ APIs.
The JWSDP (Sun) also deals with UDDI and the JAXR API (jUDDI and UDDI4J are the open source versions.)
JWSDP can support Java Service Endpoints (JSE) and EJB Endpoints, as far as I know Axis (Apache) focuses on JSE.
JWSDP works best with Sun's Java System Application Server Platform Edition 8.1 but can be used with other Application servers; Axis can run with a simple Servlet container like Tomcat or Jetty but will also work with other application servers.
Many people find Axis easier to use than JWSDP.


2. Does one require the other?


No.


3. What is the best way to learn web services (good tutorials, URLs, or books)?


Many people are looking for this and there isn't a good answer. If you going the JWSDP route, use Designing Web Services with the J2EE 1.4 Platform: JAX-RPC, SOAP, and XML Technologies for the high level and do the J2EE tutorials for the low level like:
  • Building Web Services with JAX-RPC
  • A Web Service Example: HelloServiceBean
  • You may also want to download the Adventure Builder reference application and poke around in it.
    If you are going the Axis route follow Ulf Dittmer's recommendations in Starting problem (you may want to read those articles in any case).
    [ November 10, 2005: Message edited by: Peer Reynders ]
     
    Unnsse Khan
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 511
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Which one should be used to properly prepare for the Web services exam?
     
    Peer Reynders
    Bartender
    Posts: 2968
    6
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    My choice is the Sun Java System Application Server/JWSDP combo, mainly because of the J2EE tutorials, the Blueprints book and it is a Sun certification after all - but it doesn't hurt to have the Axis/Tomcat combo installed at the same time (just don't run them at the same time).
    You'll will probably also want to review these threads/links:
  • Comparing "JAVA WEB SERVICES ARCHITECTURE" with RMH
  • Any good study guide for SCDJWS?
  • I.M.H.O. preparitions for passing the exam
  • How to read RMH
  • What is the proper web service tool that i can use in the preparation for the exam?
  • Val's SCDJWS Specifications-Objectives Matrix
  • SCDJWS Links

  • (seems www.valoxo.ch isn't responding at the moment.)
     
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 64
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Thanks very much Peer for your reply.

    That was quite useful.
     
    A berm makes a great wind break. And we all like to break wind once in a while. Like this tiny ad:
    Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
    https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
      Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic