• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

How much would putting a webservice in my app affect performance?

 
Timothy Sam
Ranch Hand
Posts: 751
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We host multiple apps in a single VPS. Assuming there would be 3 apps that uses webservices primarily, ordering systems. How much would this affect the performance of my applications having the following specs.

PIV 2.4 Ghz
256 MB guranteed ram
8GB Max RAM

I'm not sure how much bandwidth we have... Our contract just says, it's unlimited...
 
William Brogden
Author and all-around good cowpoke
Rancher
Posts: 13078
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is a very open-ended question so lets try to refine the problem a bit.
1. How many requests per second are you anticipating?
2. What would be considered "slow" response?
3. How much processing power is involved in creating a response, will each response require a DB query?
4. What are the typical and maximum request and response sizes?

With respect to bandwidth, while it is true that SOAP is a verbose communication standard, regular web pages are even worse.

Bill
 
Timothy Sam
Ranch Hand
Posts: 751
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
1. How many requests per second are you anticipating?

Let's just consider having two apps having webservices. The 1st one would only be having at least 2 request per second and only for a single day(in a week). The second one will be having maybe about 10 request per second(everyday) as it is an ordering system.

2. What would be considered "slow" response?

Slow response as in the other apps will have a hard time serving pages to clients. Clients will have to wait long for a single page to load because an app or two is using webservices. I see SOAP being disabled in some shared hosting providers.

3. How much processing power is involved in creating a response, will each response require a DB query?

Yes, the first up would only be needed to access the database from another app(which is not local to the server). The other one will be for updating another remote database.

4. What are the typical and maximum request and response sizes?

Typical request would require access to DB. Maximum response would be per DB transaction only.

With respect to bandwidth, while it is true that SOAP is a verbose communication standard, regular web pages are even worse.

So a single static HTML page serving 20 request per second would be worst than a web service serving 10 request per second?

Thank you
 
William Brogden
Author and all-around good cowpoke
Rancher
Posts: 13078
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, the first up would only be needed to access the database from another app(which is not local to the server). The other one will be for updating another remote database.

OK - that db access step is always going to be the limiting factor since it involves queries over the network. All considerations of SOAP formatting, etc. are going to be trivial compared to the DB queries in determining the response time.
Other applications running on the server should see little effect since they will be in separate threads that can run while the web service is waiting on a response from the remote database.

So a single static HTML page serving 20 request per second would be worst than a web service serving 10 request per second?

Worse only in terms of the character transmission bandwidth - remember that a typical "static HTML page" may take many request/response cycles - for images, CSS files, etc.

Bill
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!