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SOA Using Java Web Services - Which tool ?  RSS feed

 
Chart Krobtragolchai
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Hi Mark D. Hansen,

After I have read your book in the first 20-pages, I feel that your book is interesting. Your book is up-to-date, concise, practical and straight. I can tell that your book is the best Java Web Services book currently.

Why is Java Web Services so Hard ? --> This article speaks corresponding to my thinking critically. I feel like a dull & innocent child when I came across the Java Web Services world. Many detailed specification must be taken some times to accustom and understand.

In my opinion, it had been better if your book became Head First Java Web Services. Fun and friendly-brained.

In your book, you do not mention about the Java IDE you used. Maybe the maintainance reason of IDE version. I feel that the IDE tool is one of the important factor in the Java Web Services project development.

Which tool is your favorite when you work with Java Web Services project? I want the un-biased answer from your opinion.

Which tool is you used to write the example code in your book ? Do not tell me that you use the Notepad to write your code, especially dealing with WSDL.

I am very honor to talk with you.
 
Mark D. Hansen
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Thanks for your comments Maybe the "Head First" people will contact me and ask me to write a version under their label!

I do not mention the IDE used, because the code is designed to be run with any IDE. I use Eclipse - not because I think that it is the best for Java Web Services, but just because I know it the best.

Within Eclipse, I like the oXygen XML/WSDL editor plug-in. However, I have also tried the Eclipse Web Tools Platform (WTP) and it is getting better and better.

You are right - Notepad is not up to the task! I am actually an Emacs fan. I started off writing the book code with only Emacs. But, I found that a good XML/WSDL editor is a big help. And the IDE refactoring tools are essentially for updating code when there are changes to WSDL interfaces or XML Schema.

Other people worked with me on the SOA-J portion of the code and they used IntelliJ. And, I know the people at Sun all work with NetBeans. If you are using GlassFish as your Java EE container, then NetBeans is a good choice because it is better integrated with GlassFish then Eclipse. There is an Eclipse plugin for GlassFish, but I fount it to be a little clunky.

All the best!
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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