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Which Web Service implementation to use?  RSS feed

 
Greenhorn
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Hi, I need to code a simple web service which'll just accept the request & then call a Java method with the parameters from the request. Which Web Service implementation do you recommend using? I know Axis is one option. Is it the best one to go in for or any other better option is available?

Thanks.
 
Bartender
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Originally posted by Priya India:
Hi, I need to code a simple web service



The best option depends on your requirements and deployment environment. Nothing is stopping you from writing a simple servlet that processes a request and sends back a response.
In that vein XML-RPC has been around for quite some time. (XML-RPC,A DOM based XML-RPC servlet, A Simple XML-RPC Client, http://xmlrpc.sourceforge.net/).
Then there is Burlap.
In Spring you can use the HTTP invoker.

Does the web service have to be SOAP-based because you are planning to publish a WSDL? (I wouldn't describe a SOAP-based web service as simple � though there are plenty of wizards that will build your stubs from a WSDL. JAX-WS supports the dubious feature of Java based annotations to aid the generation of the web service interface).
  • Axis 1.x is based on the earlier JAX-RPC standard
  • Axis 2.x is based on the more recent JAX-WS standard
  • Spring seems to like Apache CXF (Codehouse Xfire) (JAX-WS based)
  • To get support for SLSB-based web services you have to use a full J2EE 1.4 (using JAX-RPC) or Java EE 5 (using JAX-WS; e.g. GlassFish) platform.


  • Or can the web service be a simpler REST-style web service (which could be published through WADL)?
  • JAX-WS based stacks should support REST-style web services
  • Restlet framework for Java
  • Glassfish also supports WADL.

  • Have a look at the Web Services Faq for further information.
    [ July 10, 2007: Message edited by: Peer Reynders ]
     
    Ranch Hand
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    Go for axis, its easy to start with and its documentation is also very good
     
    G Priya
    Greenhorn
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    Thanks a lot to all of you for your patient replies!



    Originally posted by Peer Reynders:


    The best option depends on your requirements and deployment environment. Nothing is stopping you from writing a simple servlet that processes a request and sends back a response.
    In that vein XML-RPC has been around for quite some time. (XML-RPC,A DOM based XML-RPC servlet, A Simple XML-RPC Client, http://xmlrpc.sourceforge.net/).
    Then there is Burlap.
    In Spring you can use the HTTP invoker.

    Does the web service have to be SOAP-based because you are planning to publish a WSDL? (I wouldn't describe a SOAP-based web service as simple � though there are plenty of wizards that will build your stubs from a WSDL. JAX-WS supports the dubious feature of Java based annotations to aid the generation of the web service interface).

  • Axis 1.x is based on the earlier JAX-RPC standard
  • Axis 2.x is based on the more recent JAX-WS standard
  • Spring seems to like Apache CXF (Codehouse Xfire) (JAX-WS based)
  • To get support for SLSB-based web services you have to use a full J2EE 1.4 (using JAX-RPC) or Java EE 5 (using JAX-WS; e.g. GlassFish) platform.


  • Or can the web service be a simpler REST-style web service (which could be published through WADL)?
  • JAX-WS based stacks should support REST-style web services
  • Restlet framework for Java
  • Glassfish also supports WADL.

  • Have a look at the Web Services Faq for further information.

    [ July 10, 2007: Message edited by: Peer Reynders ]

     
    Rancher
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    "Priya India",
    Welcome to the JavaRanch.

    We're a friendly group, but we do require members to have valid display names.

    Display names must be two words: your first name, a space, then your last name. Fictitious names are not allowed.

    Please edit your profile and correct your display name since accounts with invalid display names get deleted, often without warning

    thanks,
    Dave
     
    It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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