• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Why use J2ME

 
Trever Donta
Greenhorn
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just read that Palm will be offering a HTML browser next month. I'm wondering with all the PDA's becoming wireless and most of the smartphones containing the PC 2002 OS, why even learn J2ME. I mean why code in a different set of API's when you could just use your current servlets and jsp pages. Speed will not be an issue either because we use the wirelss Verizon sierra air cards and by May we will be able to connect to the internet at 40 to 60k. By the end of the year speeds will be up to 1.2g. So being a developer I'm saying to myself why learn this when all I have to do is modify my current web apps to detect smartphones, or PDA and format the output based on the device........Any clarification or help would be appreciated.
 
Po-yu Chien
Ranch Hand
Posts: 45
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In some situation, people tend to rely more on
local application which store data locally.
 
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff
Posts: 6037
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This question was asked about 15 years ago and recently revisited in the last 4 years. (And probably more times then that, but this is what I know about.)
In the very old days, we had dumb terminals, and all processing was done on the server. Then we had the microcomputer revolution in the early 80's. We made use of the power desktop machines with client-server architectures.
With the advent of the web, people created ultrathin clients--web front ends. It has lots of advantages, such as little, if any, distribution overhead. However, there are still many reasons to not move to an ultrathin client.
First, you must consider the ratio of the cost of bandwidth to the cost of validation. It would be a shame to have to upload data, in 5 meg chunks, only to have the server reject the data as invalid. That would waste much time and bandwidth, it would be nicer if the client could have done the validation, and not wasted the bandwidth on bad data. With the relatively high cost of wireless bandwidth, especially with some of the pay-per-byte programs, this is an attractive option.
Second, there's data ownership, perhaps you wish to keep the data locally, but it requires some hard computing to use it as such.
Third, there's offline capabilities. most desktop machines have a stable connection to the internet. Wireless devices regularly get out of range. Think of equipment used at construction sites, mine shafts, rural sites, wilderness, etc. The application is made to be used in locations where there is no connection.
These are just some of the reasons to use J2ME.
--Mark
 
JoelDDrechsler
Greenhorn
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh it's true, it's damn true!
I work at a wireless company and do you know how much it costs to get wireless internet and also how unstable it is? I have started monkeying with J2ME CLDC mostly due to the fact that most devices are really LIMITED connected whether they like it or not.
There's always gonna be people who'd rather have a stable local app that they own than a thin client layer they borrow.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic