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Code at line 1 does ???

 
Ranch Hand
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Can you tell what does the method at ///line1 does?
Please explain

public class Question32{
public static void main(String[] args){
String[] s1 = new String[]{null,"Hello"};
String s2 = s1[1].intern(); ///line 1
String s3 = s2.toString();
if(s3 == s2)
System.out.println("Equal");
}
}
 
Greenhorn
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In short, the intern method returns a string that has the same contents as the calling string.

FROM THE API
************

intern
public String intern()Returns a canonical representation for the string object.
A pool of strings, initially empty, is maintained privately by the class String.

When the intern method is invoked, if the pool already contains a string equal to this String object as determined by the equals(Object) method, then the string from the pool is returned. Otherwise, this String object is added to the pool and a reference to this String object is returned.

It follows that for any two strings s and t, s.intern() == t.intern() is true if and only if s.equals(t) is true.

All literal strings and string-valued constant expressions are interned. String literals are defined in �3.10.5 of the Java Language Specification


Returns:
a string that has the same contents as this string, but is guaranteed to be from a pool of unique strings.
 
author
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The good news is that you won't be tested on this topic in the exam!
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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