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Approach to exam questions

 
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Does anyone have an approach to exam questions that works? Like when approaching a question follow these steps:

1. Check access of the Class.
2. Check this
3. etc...

I am thinking that if I can train myself to follow a pattern I can score better and avoid many silly mistakes that I am making now on the Self-Test question at the end of each chapter.

Thank you.
Higgledy
 
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This is a good question, and I think the fact you're asking it means you're already on the right track.

A big part of the learning process is in sorting out the pieces and then making sense of them. So a "checklist" or generalized approach is a lot like flash cards: It will work best if you make your own rather than using something provided by someone else.

If you're able to identify the "silly mistakes" you're making on self-tests and mock exams, then you should be able to put together your own checklist of mistakes to avoid.

To get started, here is a list of potential trips and traps.
 
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1)determine what the nature of question is(usually last line of the question)?
Are you looking for an output.....

2)read the answers. Trying to remember them for a couple of minutes.

3)Read the question statement paying attention to detail.

4)unless answer is obvious. try to eliminate as many incorrect choices as possible.

5)If you still have no clue. guess. Blank answers are automatically wrong.
 
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i think there is a little mistake in trips & traps:

No inner class can have a static member.


should be changed to

No non-static inner class can have a static member.



regards
 
marc weber
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From Section 8.1.3 of the Java Language Specification...

An inner class is a nested class that is not explicitly or implicitly declared static.


So we could say, "No non-static nested class can have a static member." Or equivalently, "No inner class can have a static member."

(Although better phrasing might be, "Inner classes cannot have static members.")
[ March 17, 2006: Message edited by: marc weber ]
 
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