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Check user permission

 
Kausalya Ramakrishnan
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Hi all,

I need to check whether a user has permission to perform a task.In my case,I have created a HTML file that uploads files to a location.Before allowing the user to upload the files,I need to check whether the user has permission to do this by using applets in the client side.How do I proceed on this.Any help on this would be really great.

Thanks in advance.
 
Ulf Dittmer
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Welcome to JavaRanch.

How does the authentication system work? Why do you need to use applets instead of standard web app mechanisms?
 
Kausalya Ramakrishnan
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Actually,as per the requirement,I am supposed to check with applets.I did not get any idea on how to proceed.Is it possible to chck user permission with applets?
 
Ulf Dittmer
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While it is possible to have an applet ask for a username and password (and then verify it with the server), I would question that requirement. If this is a web application, it's much more natural, and much easier to use standard web app authentication. Where are the users, roles and passwords defined - in a database on the server?
 
Cameron Wallace McKenzie
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The question really becomes where are the username and passwords stored, and how do you get to them?

You can easily create an applet that starts off with a username and password field. Then, if the username and passwords are in a JDBC addressable database, you can call back to the database using an embedded net driver. Sure, we're talking open ports like crazy, giving an architecture review board a heart attack, but it's certainly possible.

Does sound like a strange approach. I'd really be interested in the justifications for this approach. I think there are easier ways, all things being equal.

-Cameron McKenzie
 
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