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Floating point divide by zero

 
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Can anybody explain whether the following statement is true or not.
If true, please explain.

Floating point modulo (%) by zero produces NaN , but floating point divide by zero does not.
 
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Hi
Its true
Floating point divide by zero produces Infinity & Floating point modulo by zero produces NaN(not a number)
 
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does anyone know the reason behind this ?

Why arithmetic exception happens for int and not for float ?
[ March 28, 2007: Message edited by: JB Ramesh ]
 
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Originally posted by JB Ramesh:
does anyone know the reason behind this ?

Why arithmetic exception happens for int and not for float ?



The behavior of float is actually defined by the IEEE standard. Java follows the same standard used by most floating point processors in use today.

As for int, it throws an exception, because there is no representation for infinity or NaN.

Henry
 
Srinivas Kumar
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My actual doubt is that floating point module zero also does divide by zero internally. So why Nan is getting printed instead of Infinity?
 
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