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Mock Test Doubt

 
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i had given mocks that come with the book scjp 5 by kathy and bates,got 55 and 57 % respectively.

i cannot analyze that how well i am prepared for the final exam?

please tell is this a very bad score or what?

regards,
Sharan...
 
sharan vasandani
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i will be glad if someone guides me...
 
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i had given mocks that come with the book scjp 5 by kathy and bates,got 55 and 57 % respectively.



Good!
Two questions to ask from you!
Was that first attempt?
Sometimes what happens, when you have gone through a mock test several times,
human brain tendency, it stores the picture of the question and answer of that. If it was your first attempt the score is not so bad because the K&B
questions are already tough. It is for sure that you would have learned a lot from your mistakes. Why don't you write down why did you chose particular answer specially those, you chose wrong. If you don't work on the questions you chose wrong, you will always remain in the dilemma and the probability is much high that when the same kind of question comes before you you would chose the incorrect one what you did in the past (overlooked the details that you must have considered). This is what my experience says.
You will do the best I wish. Keep practicing and analyzing the wrong answers.

By the way, when are you supposed to write the exam?


With Best Wishes, (I hope to receive the same from you too)

cmbhatt
 
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Well, as far as the SCJP 5.0 is concerned, you need to score atleast 59% (43 out of 72 questions) inorder to pass the exam. Jugding by the score that you got, i think you are doing good but need focus a bit more on your weak areas.

I havent tried the masterexam, but does it gives you an analysis of your weak areas??

I think inorder to analyze yourself better, try the Whizlabs SCJP 5.0 Simulator. It will tell you better about your weak areas. you can analyze yourself even on particular topics you wish to choose. Plus, it will also give you a practice of the Drag-n-Drop kind of questions which comprise around 30% of the questions in the actual exam. That's around 22 drag-n-drop questions to be cleared & if you are not prepared for it then it would be almost impossible for you to clear the exam.

Also, i would suggest you to code as much as possible & try to experiment a lot. It happens a lot many times that even though you have read the whole book thoroughly, still you might come across questions which test you on the variations of the concepts which you have read.

Here are a few other tips from http://faq.javaranch.com/view?ScjpFaq:

3. Code Code Code. There is a lesson to be learned in every code example of every book you read. Learn the lessons and learn to code at the same time. The difference between someone who has spent the time to code and someone who is merely memorizing answers is immediately apparent in thier test progress. Someone who codes regularly will quickly pick-up on the intricate questions being asked on the exam. Someone who is memorizing answers will get lost easily once the questions deviate from what they've memorized. On the job, the memorized-no-coding person will be quickly fired, while also proving the test to be inneffective in the minds of the employer who f/hired them.

4. Study with friends. There's an old axiom that goes: "if you put 100 programmers in a room and give them 1 problem, you'll get 100 different answers, and most will work." By studying with others you'll be able to see how others approach the questions and exercises you'll be studying. When I study for a certification, my initial approach to a problem is rarely the best one. But if I'm studying with others, I can see many approaches and find out which one is best for me.

5. Use Mnemonic Devices. The thing about memorable mnemonics is that they help put information into your long-term memory instead of your near-short term memory. This means you won't be "brain-dumping" your newly learned lessons after the test. My favorite mnemonics are acronyms. Its amazing how memorable a lasciviously written acronym is. :-) Make 'em dirty to make 'em last.

6. Don't try to learn the entire language in a week/month, take your time. There's the French cognitive psychologist name Piaget who postulated that adults learn sequentially and cumulatively. Basically what this means is that before you can learn how to write an inner class, you first need to learn how to write a regular class. You can try and skip right to the inner class if you want, but you won't learn the "whys" of it. Its just as important for us human beings to learn the background of something as it is to learn the thing itself. Now, if you're a martian, venusian, or uranusian, that may not apply. if you are a venusian learning Java, I say welcome to our new Venusian Overlords!

7. Learn "why" something works a given way, not just that it works one way. Other psychologists have postulated that there are three stages to learning. There's recognizing something, rote memorization, and being able to create something new from your memorized material. This is usually applied to the learning of human languages, but it applied to Java Certification prep as well. Here's how they differ. Being able to recognize that something is written in Java is nice, but you have to know how to use the language also. Recognizing but not really being able to use is the first level. Not really useful. Being able to recite all parts of the Java Language is certainly better than just recognizing it. Unfortunately, being able to recite the number of bits in an Integer doesn't mean you'll be able to use it in code. Finally, being able to create algorithms in the language, that's where you want to be before you take your certification exam. That's what employers are looking for. That's why K&M ask you questions that make you think. And that's why the people that can use the language most effectively are the ones who don't get laid off.

Also, we are going to create a study group over here. So you are most welcome if you want to join us.

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Sourin.

[ April 10, 2007: Message edited by: Sourin K. Sen ]
[ April 10, 2007: Message edited by: Sourin K. Sen ]
 
sharan vasandani
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chandra,

i am planning to give the test in the month of may.

and yes i am willing to join the study group,sauren
 
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