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static nested classes

 
Greenhorn
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please explain what is happening in this line in detail

MyOuter.MyNested n = new MyOuter.MyNested();
 
Ranch Hand
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MyOuter.MyNested n = new MyOuter.MyNested();

MyNested is the static nested class of MyOuter. Hence it's just behaves like a static member of the class MyOuter.
Since to access the static member of the class you need to access it with the enclosing class, same thing is happening here..
to access MyNested you need to enclose it with MyOuter.

Refer Ch-8 K&B for more details
 
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Hi,

You are creating object of static member class. The member class is always refered in context of the enclosing class. So when you create a object of that class you create it with this syntax.

OuterClassName.InnerClassName refName = new OuterClassNamesName.StaticInnerClassName();

When a class member is static you can access directly with class name.

In case of non-static , it will be

OuterClassName.InnerClassName refName = new OuterClassNamesName().new StaticInnerClassName();

Thats the difference .

HTH,

Vivian
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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