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Career Advice

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 22
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I've recently began a position working in the ITS dept of a non-tech company. The position was described to me as design and development using Java, JSP, Oracle, and Servlets. 1.5 months later the job has turned into customizing a third-party product which creates cookie-cutter eBusiness sites (it doesn't work that well to boot). I really don't want to sit around and modify someone else's code, I'd rather develop. Also, I feel that I'm not gaining any experience other that basic Java Lang skills. I know staying with a company only a month and a half looks bad to any prespective employer, but are these reasons good enough? Or should I just suck it up and stay here for six months?
Thanks
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 300
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i believe if your not happy the hell with the world its time to move on you got to do for you not for others start looking for other oppurtunities if something that sounds good comes along go for it
 
Trailboss
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Talk to your current employer first. Let your manager know that this is not what you want to do. If your manager doesn't solve your problem in a week, hit the streets and scrounge up a new gig. You have a good excuse. In fact, you can probably score a pay raise.
 
Desperado
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I agree with Paul. Tell them how the position was described to you and how it turned out. If nothing comes out of it, just tell the prospective employers exactly what happened. That's all they need to hear, i.e. the truth.
Java programmers are in hot demand so it's your call, not theirs
 
Ranch Hand
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Java programmers are in hot demand so it's your call
Tony:
Could you please elaborate on this as to how to start a
good job search...while posting the resume on websites
like monster.com or careerbuilders.com etc is one option...
are there any better ones you can suggest?
Thanks.
- satya
 
Todd M Bush
Greenhorn
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Thank you for your advice. I will take it to heart. I was reminded this morning, without saying anything, that the third party product in question was what the company decided to use and we have to use it. Doesn't look like I'll be here long.
Thanks again.
 
paul wheaton
Trailboss
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I think posting to monster and dice is a bad idea. I prefer to go to these places to see what is offered and then maybe send e-mails to some recently posted gigs.
 
Rancher
Posts: 241
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It's not a bad idea if you like attention . However many of those calls were for jobs halfway, if not all the way, across the country (I got one call for a fulltime JavaScript job in Seattle, and I'm a Java guy in NYC!). So for finding a job that's best, it probably is best to do a little targeting.
Eric
 
Ranch Hand
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I posted on a site, a few years ago, that asked if you were interested in re-locating. I checked no and still was beseiged by recruiters from all over the country. I guess they have a different definition of a decent commute.
 
Ranch Hand
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The thing I hate the most is when recruiters don't respect what someone writes on their resume. It's the No Means No -VS- You Know You Want to...mentality. In my own job search I have reservations about posting to the big boards, the same place I go sometimes to search for candidates. Mostly for reasons of confidentiality..but also for fear of being bombarted with garbage.
I agree with the 'resume push' relpying only to posts. You can gauge the insight a company has to it's own needs and research the company before you apply. You can also tailor a cover letter specific to them for the "oh wow" factor. Even in an employees market that is a good idea.
Not every great job is posted. So, if you do post you resume, restrict your contact information. Dont list references on a posted resume, make them "Available upon request" and be discrete. Also only list an email initially, onw set up soley for your search that you can trw away when your done.
This forces any company to contact you that way. If they don't give you a job description up front and you are impressed with the initial contact letter, then request one. Eventually, they will want to talk to you. Then, call them first, unless you feel comfortable.
Doing it this way will decrease your chanses of people harrassing you with petty offers now and two years from now when your career objective will be completely different. This way makes it harder for a recruiter to find or contact you, but the ones worth their salt will. Those are the ones you will want to work with.
If you are professional contractor, you may want to make your info a tad more public or keep a database of good firms that you worked with, even if you didn't take an assignment with them.
Lastly, do not under estimate the power your peer group! Things like coming here to Java Ranch is a good way to find out about the history other's experiences with employers, who walks the walk and who is B.S. If you have an Association for Interrnet Professionals (AIP) group near you, that is a good way to get a feel for the Technology Landscape and network with others like you. I'm certain there are other networkig groups near you, both on-line and on-land, that you can tap into for info on prospective empoyers.

My $0.02
-Patrick Krook
Tactical Recruiter
 
paul wheaton
Trailboss
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Patrick makes a really good point.
I know that I have lined up several gigs for people I knew were good with places that needed good people. I met these people at conferences and sometimes I worked with them in the past.
Tony Alicea told me he was looking for a gig and I tried to entice him to Denver to work for the company I was currently working for.
Networking!
 
Consider Paul's rocket mass heater.
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