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Today, after 2.5 months of professional Java developer experience (and one year exactly from when I started studying Java almost full time), I was asked to join my current "temp" employer as a so-called "permanent" employee.
Because I had no work experience 2.5 months ago, they offered me to join as a contractor with option, after 3 months, to become a regular employee.
I accepted without even knowing what the salary will be My tech supervisor used the phrase "I don't have the figures with me here but I don't think that will be a problem..."
This is a major achievement for me in my calculated and risky endeavor that I took two years ago when I left the boring procedural, C, automobile traffic related project in Miami "with no place to go". (BTW, that project was a failure. The State of Florida is out of $12 million without much to show for it, but I digress...)
I moved to Orlando where my mother let me stay with her and her husband while I decided what to do, what to study, and in what order (HTML-4 w/JavaScript and CSS, and then Java). Without that help I would not have been able to be doing J2EE stuff right after passing certification (with 98%).
And of course, thanks to sites like this one and Marcus'...
ADDENDUM: The VP of MIS, E-Commerce Division just dropped by and asked me to his office where we discussed salary and my tech sup was right: NO PROBLEM! Significantly more than the figures that where thrown around, 2.5 months ago! Great!
[This message has been edited by Tony Alicea (edited February 08, 2001).]
 
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wow tony good for you
good luck
so your not actually switching positions just getting more money and benefits
hope to hear alot of stories like this one
 
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Congrats, Tony.
Its a day for you .....
Enjoy....
- satya
 
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Tony,
I really keep wondering how programming is in the real world. I am in the position you were 2.5 months ago. That is, I have never used Java at Industry level. I wonder if you could give me an idea of what it is like, what you need I think to know as an add on to my certification to be appreciated (and marketable)at work.Were you comfortable when you took your first assignments at work just by being certified or you had some other skills ?
And congrats for your success.All the best,
Herbert.
 
Tony Alicea
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Thanks, Herbert and Satya,
Yes I had other skills, one of which helped me be a success in a recent assignment involving JSPs: HTML in-depth knowledge
I have known HTML-4 with JavaScript and CSS before I studied Java.
Also, get your feet wet ASAP with EJBs, Servlets and JSPs. The rest will come by addition...
[This message has been edited by Tony Alicea (edited July 20, 2000).]
 
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Way to go Tony! Sounds like you are well on your way to building an excellend career.
 
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Tony,
It�s nice to listen for stories like this.
That is Tony�s way! Javaranch Sheriff, 98%, recently java worker
congratulations and best luck!
Adrian
 
Tony Alicea
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Thanks Adrian and Paul and everyone else!
 
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This is great news, Tony. Keep us posted.
Eric
 
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Congrats Tony.
I am a Chemical Engineer by profession but love OOAD & Unix (Solaris & Linux). I have some sparce working knowledge of FORTRAN, C & C++.
I cleared SCJP on 22/6 with 93%. Now, I want to study HTML,DHTML or XML. Since you have known these areas I would like to know on which should I concentrate? I know XML is the trend now, but is it Microsoft oriented? Your guidance will be appreciated.
thanks in advance,
regards
-Shiny
 
Tony Alicea
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Shiny,
Knowing HTML well has helped me immeasurably doing JavaServer Pages at work. I think everyone that's going to work in at least the "presentation tier" of the J2EE should be required to know HTML and I don't mean just how to underline text in italics.
JavaScript, which I also learned to my satisfaction before Java, is mostly useful in Intranet applications where the client computer is well known and dictated by corporate standard. But not for the public Web, especially if you're trying to SELL stuff over it.
DHTML is the marriage between HTML-4, and JavaScript (or another scripting language like Visual Basic script), with some CSS if you like (I use it in my site but Netscape is not as able as IE4/5 with DHTML).
That particular skill I don't know how useful it would be in a Java environment (unless again, we are talking about an Intranet).
Now about XML... You should know the basics. Those are really easy if you know HTML already (and even if you don't). Of course I have no idea of what knowledge would be required in a particular situation.
At least you should know what a well formed and valid document is.
Did I mention Servlets?
They are the key, i.e., they are the controllers in the MVC pattern. I'm glad I never learned CGI (or C++ for that matter!)
 
Shiny
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Thanks Tony for your guidance.
'HTML' for Internet, 'JSP/Servlets' for Intranet with 'DHTML' flavor and toppings of 'XML basics'....I got it.
Could you, if possible, direct me to good links on 'Design Patterns'. Ofcourse I plan to buy the famous foursome book, but it will take a while to gather so much money....
thanks again
--Shiny
 
Tony Alicea
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I don't have The Famous Book that you mention
I hear that it's highly theoretical (and I'm a college Physics major!)
In summary you should know HTML well IF you're going to program for the Web using JavaServer Pages.
Also, get the Ed Roman book on J2EE and the (published by Manning) JSP book.
 
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