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JOB availability?

 
Greenhorn
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Hi,
Do you have some idea on what is the value of java certification
in USA?Are jobs available for entry level? especially North East?
 
Ranch Hand
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I have the same question.
But I think most employers won't want entry level programmers.
What they want is experience,experience and experience,especially experience with enterprise developement.
 
Ranch Hand
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Hi Solomon and Bin
So what does that mean... ..I mean for a person like me..with a non programming no computer science dgree....and trying to get into programming thru java..Does it have the worth of trying and getting certified... ..I am working on it since 6 months or so
And i am trying to work on geting the certificate now..But the whole point of doing all this was to change career from Architecture to IT. And that means by geing a beginner level job atleast.
So what do you guys say...
Lets share our thoughts
cheers
Nasir
 
Ranch Hand
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dear Ahmed Nasir,
I am myself an Architect by education who has changed over to programming. My advice would be that java certification will help you get jobs/ change jobs but you shouldnt depend on just certification. One good thing is that software is a constantly changing field. So you should keep an eye on what are the latest technologies and try to master them. Besides to do well in a field, you should be willing to take a lot of initiative. try to implement the knowledge that you gain. Like some people will suggest you, try to make your own site, or your own software. If you have enought interest, its not difficult to work in the field of software engineering.
 
Sheriff
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I am moving this discussion to Jobs Discussion forum where it can attract more attention and opinions
Ajith
 
Ranch Hand
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A year ago today I was 9 years into a career as a photogrammetrist(read: cartographer) <-- (no programming involved), making a very modest income, and looking at many more years of the same (as my brain stagnated). In January, I started out taking a 3 credit class in Java at a local school. As I started into the second quarter of class, I wrote up the most favorable resume I could, and started sending it out. Before the middle of the second quarter I had secured a job as an entry-level Java developer with a salary over $50K/yr. I've been at it now for 3 months and it has proven to be a
great move. I love my job and I actually get paid to think. By the way: I am not certified.
The key was being willing to play a numbers game. I sent a lot of resumes to a lot of companies, and ALWAYS followed up with phone calls. Most companies were not interested at all. Especially consulting firms; they need to fill positions with experienced people. Just remember: as they're saying "no thanks" remember to ask if they might know of anyone else who may be in a position to consider entry-level candidates. It was off such a referral that I got in touch with this company. (That reminds me... I owe that guy a dinner!) When you find a company with the right situation, it's not so difficult to get in the door.
All together, I probably sent out less than 100 resumes, most of them via e-mail, mostly through job-boards like dice.com, computerjobs.com, monster.com, etc, and some through technical job fairs.
There is hope for you career changers!

[This message has been edited by Peter Lyons (edited October 06, 2000).]
 
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I am also a career changer. I have an accounting degree and I am a CPA. I was able to switch into programming and web development at my current company by starting with excel and access. Since I was in accounting, reporting is one of thier big functions, so excel and access along with VBA were pretty big. Once I got database theory down and visual basics, moving over was easy. I also quickly picked up HTML and knowing VB made ASP a breeze. Then I just met with the IT manager and moved on over. But I think the big thing for me was not what I knew, but how I present myself. In interviews or on phone calls, or resumes and cover letters, I stressed the fact that I love doing this stuff, I love programming and learning new things. I showed that I am always reading and learning more, as I am doing with Java right now, and that I love the challenges of tackling something new. I also knew businesses and how to communicate well, which went a long way. I have found that companies are looking more for people who want to do and show a great interest in getting better and learning more, as opposed to someone who waits passively for things to come to them, and only learn when needed to, and not as an ongoing thing. Just something that helped me out.
 
Rancher
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Ubuntu
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These posts are fabulous. Thank you for sharing your success stories.
 
Ahmed Nasir
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Hi evrybody and thanks for sharing the thoughts and stories.
Nice to meet you here and Mohit and Peter you really made my day by posting your messages. I started java by sitting in a course of Java Programming in Feb. 2000. I had no idea about programming at that time..So took a course which had no programming requisite. Anyway..I once attempeted the exam in July and failed.
Untill just before now strongly believed that its impossible to get a decent job without cerification. I am much more comfortable with java now compared to the last time I attempted exam, but I am still not very comfortable about the exam
But Peter your story has given me ideas, which were coming to my mind lately (ever since I felt that I can program).
I am in bad need of IT work environment to develop and gain.
Right now I am working in a GIS and mapping environment.
So my message here is to add to what has been said above that doing it and being committed to it is most important.
So wishing all of us good luck I hope we keep in touch.
Thanks
Nasir
[This message has been edited by Ahmed Nasir (edited October 07, 2000).]
 
Ahmed Nasir
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hi Peter...See you around..
Please send me some more info about how is the current situation and stuff..I am really encouraged. Thanks.
Cheers
Nasir
[This message has been edited by Ahmed Nasir (edited October 09, 2000).]
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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