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Job Interview Book

 
Greenhorn
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hi all,
I am graduating on August with a BS dregree in computer science. Can anyone please recommend some good books about job interview.

Eric Chan
Sun Certified Programmer for the Java� 2 Platform

 
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Eric:
Try Martin Yates "Knock 'Em Dead" book on interviewing. You an get at amazon.com
I do hope you are talking with the career services folks at your college. It's a lot easier to interview on-campus than it is by hitting the streets.
----
You will want to hit up the managerial type questions that Yate lists in his text:
Example questions that you WILL get hit with:
1. Tell me why you chose this college?
2. Tell me about a project you worked on.
3. What were your strenghts on the project.
4. What were your weak points on the project.
5. How did you deal with slackers on a project.
6. How do your resolve conflict? Note: Don't answer about breaking up a fight. The recruiter is looking for time managmenet - can you handle multiple tasksa at one time.
----------
So how do you answer the above - through stories. You should have 3 or 4 good stories (related to the IT profession and your college experiences (sportes/student govt/etc - you want a good mix here). Martin Yate book shows you how to do this.
Do a search (in this forum) under my last name for more interview advice and my job search strategies and success stories.
Good luck and keep us posted.
John Coxey
(jpcoxey@aol.com)
 
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I've heard very good things about "What Color Is Your Parachute? A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers"
--Mark
 
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I have been the interviewer and the interviewee, and my opinion is.....
There are basic questions you are always asked ( as John has listed).... you want to answer they're questions, but add just a little more than they asked for that may give them a better idea of a skill or talent that you have. ie.."Yes I have 2 years experience in skillA. I also used skillB with skillA at companyA while we were working on a XXX project which...." This way you provide a little depth to each of the answers.
Sometimes lead into or start on an answer you know they are leading up to. That way you look more agressive and giving them a feel for your people skills. It really doesn't come off good when you just matter-of-factly answer the question, and clam up. And then they ask the next question. Try and turn it into a conversation you are having with someone at a conference. Your peers discussing something you have in common. This gives a good impression about your people skills, and leaves them feeling like they enjoyed a conversation instead of trudging through an interview.
HTH
Dan


[This message has been edited by Daniel Dunleavy (edited July 12, 2001).]
[This message has been edited by Daniel Dunleavy (edited July 12, 2001).]
 
John Coxey
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Daniel:
I agree with you exactly.
This is why you need to develop 3 or 4 stories. As you get better at the interview process - you will know what to add or delete from your stories. This is why I take notes (if I can) at an interview - and why I immediately force myself to sit in the car for 10-15 minutes after the interview and write all my throughts down.
Not only does it prepare me for the next inerview - but if I took some company/project information notes down, I can include them in my thank-you letter. By doing this, I have separated myself from the crowd. Just another technique of the game.
If you play the interview game long enough - you come up with some pretty unique and agressive (off the wall) strategies for furthering your cause.
John Coxey
(jpcoxey@aol.com)
[This message has been edited by John Coxey (edited July 12, 2001).]
 
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