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Academe? Is it worth it?

 
Greenhorn
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I just received two offers to teach Java, C++, etc.: one full-time, the other part-time (i.e.paid by the hour).
Should I even consider any of these offers? Guys what are my pros and cons? Need your input. Oh, and would anyone know the salary range for instructors?
 
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Teaching at what level? High school? Community college? University?
 
Patricia Anderson
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John,
One is a full-time gig at the University.
The other one is with corportate clients.

 
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Hello Patricia,
I am a trainer myself ,working for a SUN partner
in India for the last 1 year.And believe me i have learnt
quite a lot during this period as a trainer and it is lotsov
fun too.
In my point of view,
the pros would be that, you can increase your knowledge in
these area's and you can become quite an expert.Not to mention
honing of skills like public speaking,communicative english etc.

The cons would be that teaching experience is not counted as
development experience .But you can take up the second job
(as a corporate trainer) and work part time as a developer.
Moreover teaching corporates can also bring you opportunities
where the company might ask you to join them if you perform
well.
And regarding pay , i really can't tell you a figure coz it
depends on so many things like no of students,study material,
labs,duration of the course etc.
But I Hope this helps..
regards,
Manjunath
 
John M. Gabriele
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Patricia,
I taught physics labs for a short time at a University as a grad student. I always like the university atmosphere. The students were fairly motivated, and there's just so many great resources on campus. Theatre, inexpensive movies, concerts, etc. Sounds like a great opportunity. I'd take it. Good luck!
---John
 
Author
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Wow. I think either could be a great opportunity. (How it will effect your career depends on what you've done, and what you wnat to do. In generaly, I would say a 1-2 year teaching position would be good.)
I used to TA in grad school, and found it very useful. First, I learned the material much better, and in greater detail, after teaching it. Second, it developed useful skills: teaching, public speaking/presenting, planning, etc. I also briefly ran a 6 weeks training program at my current company, but it was much smaller scale--still, I learned from that, too.
What are you teaching, to whom, and how long? The university job sounds like a semester class, probably teaching to undergrads. Is it teaching just Java/C++? Are you teaching algorithms? Does it cover theory? Is there a major term project?
What about the corporate job? Is it a one week crash course? Is it a 4 week program? Is it s crash course for consultants or executives? Is it trying to turn non-programmers into programmers, or extend the capabilities of in house programmers? Are you teaching basic APIs? Are you focused on specific applications? Will you be repeatedly teaching the same course over and over, week after week? Will that get boring?
As for salary range, that can vary based on: your skills, the coplexity of the material your teaching, how likely they can find others to teach it (intro to Java, there are plenty of people doing that), and, of course, corporate will almost always pay more than academia.
Although they may seem similar at first pass, these two positions can be as different as night and day.
--Mark

 
Patricia Anderson
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Thank you for all the input.
The university work includes teaching data structures/algorithms, database, Java, C++, and maybe any subject those with tenure do not want to teach.
 
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