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The reaction of the poster is interesting. He assumes that because the company wants a non-programming skill, it means they want you to be an expert in that skill. Exposure and high-level understanding is not the same thing as (e.g. PhD-level) expertise. He seems to think it unusual for a company to prefer candidates that know something about the business they are in.
:roll:
 
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Many positions on Wall St require programming eocnomic models, so it's not surprising that the like to see math skills. As for high paying, well $100K in a Wall St. firm is good, but not top notch.
--Mark
 
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These 'technologies'go in and out of fashion!
If Wall St. wants Math experts, why don't they hire math grads(BS/MS/Phd) straight from universities? One of my friend who obtained phd in Math(game theory,) was searching for job for 5 months, recently got a job as economist in SFO.
20 years back it was Chemical engg. was a fashion(atleast here in India), then last 10/12 years, its Computer Sc, now its seem to be a turn of Queen of sciences
 
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"sprintup",
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Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by sprintup:
These 'technologies'go in and out of fashion!
If Wall St. wants Math experts, why don't they hire math grads(BS/MS/Phd) straight from universities? One of my friend who obtained phd in Math(game theory,) was searching for job for 5 months, recently got a job as economist in SFO.


Actually, they do that, too. My friend is a math/econ major from Harvard and starts his job on Wall St next month.

--Mark
 
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The use of scientists and mathematicians to do computer work that requires substantial education or experiance outside computer science has been going on for a long time, and is a separate job track than the typical software engineering track. The pay scale for these jobs often that of the scientific expertise, not the programming scale.
 
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I have to entirely agree with John on this one. During my degree I worked with a lot of physcisits and statisticians. Many of these were hired into programming positions requiring their particular expertise in their fields, and pay was mainly related to those skills.
 
Roseanne Zhang
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There are two different roles:
Developers understand the math.
Mathematicians know how to program.
We have both in shop.
[ July 05, 2002: Message edited by: Roseanne Zhang ]
 
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