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Differences between US and European degrees

 
Richard Scothern
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Hi,
I'm curious to know what differences there are between BS computer science degrees in the US and Europe.
I read that the US skills shortage of the late 90's was caused by colleges not producing the right kind of CS graduates. I've also seen a lot of cases where people take computer science and philosophy together, or other subject that don't appear to complement each other. However, the high standards of US universities would bely the idea that this were a bad thing.
I've just finished a BS computer science in the UK and would like to now how this is viewed in the US.
Richard
 
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Hopefully somebody will answer how European degree is viewed in the US, but this view only reflects current state of preconceptions
It would be interesting if we could make comparison more substantial.
Richard, could you list courses you had to take? Which languages/databases etc. you have experience with?
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Richard Scothern:
I'm curious to know what differences there are between BS computer science degrees in the US and Europe.

Generally speaking, European degrees are seen as inferior to US degrees, here in the US. The programs aren't seen to be as comprehensive or rigorous. This is true at all levels, BS, masters, and PhD, although as you move up the degree level, the difference increases.
Originally posted by Richard Scothern:
I read that the US skills shortage of the late 90's was caused by colleges not producing the right kind of CS graduates. I've also seen a lot of cases where people take computer science and philosophy together, or other subject that don't appear to complement each other. However, the high standards of US universities would bely the idea that this were a bad thing.

Can you give me a reference? My view has always been that collegese do a great job of teaching CS. However, since most of their graduates go on to become software engieering, they are misaligned. It's like asking mechanical engineers to be physics majors. There are very few software engineering programs in the US. Of course, European CS programs suffer from the same problem.

--Mark
 
Joseph Hammerman
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In the US, Bachelors degrees do not require the same degree of concentration on one subject as in most other countries.
Top US universities are well regarded internationally in technology. However, there are also very weak US schools that give easy degrees.
I have seen catalogues for CS and related programs at British universities, and the programs seem more rigorous and practical than US programs.
Computer science programs everywhere suffer from the problem that academia is removed from reality. The people teaching computer science often do not have strong academic background or experience in that area.
 
SJ Adnams
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I know of many people from the UK who took a US degree course because they could take a broad range of subjects, whereas in the UK you are pretty much forced to take a single subject.
I would like to think that it is the students that make a university 'good', rather than a 'good' university producing good people (at university you must learn, you are not taught in the traditional sense).
 
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