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graduation honors on resume

 
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OK, here is one for you resume experts. It's official, I got my diploma in the mail and I really did graduate .
My question now is whether or not to put any graduation honors on the resume. I used to ahve my current GPA on there but now that I'm done should I just list the honors, or just the GPA or both. I'd hate to come off to a potential employer as some super-geek, on the other hand I'd hate to lose a job to Poindexter
If I do put the actual honors on the resume should I assume that they know the cooresponding GPA or list that too?
The resume sites I've been to mostly only talk about honors such as Deans list and things like that.
thanks everyone...
[ September 23, 2002: Message edited by: Dave Vick ]
 
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I assume by honors you mean something like magna cum laude. This should definately be listed on your resume. I would recommend listing your GPA for the first 2-3 years. After that it gets to be moot.
--Mark
 
Dave Vick
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Cool, thanks Mark. I'm never sure where the line is between what the employer wants to know and what they think of as bragging.
I'll include it then.
Thanks again
 
Sheriff
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Just bear in mind that these things are very much a "local" phenomenon. Anyone not brought up in the US school system is unlikely to have much idea what "GPA" and "magna cum laude" mean (I don't, for example). Even people who know what the terms mean may not have much idea how that translates into working with a professional team to produce business value.
The upshot of this is that these should perhaps be treated as "interesting side dishes" rather than the "meat" of your resum�. What a potential employer really wants to know is how well you can do the job he has an opening for, so things which advance that idea should always appear the most important.
 
Dave Vick
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Originally posted by Frank Carver:

The upshot of this is that these should perhaps be treated as "interesting side dishes" rather than the "meat" of your resum�.


I agree. Basicially it came down to having a line like this:
Bachelor�s degree in Computer and Information Science. Graduated magna cum laude from Cleveland State University, August 2002.
or a line like this:
Bachelor�s degree in Computer and Information Science. Cleveland State University, August 2002.
I just wasn't sure if the honors belonged in a resume or not.
 
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I think I had something like
xxx degree, President's List for high academic achievement. I thought that spelling it out for the reader is better than leaving room for interpretation. "magna cum laude" isn't used much around these parts.
Jamie
 
Dave Vick
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I dont think there is another name for it. I guess I could say something like:
Bachelor�s degree in Computer and Information Science. Graduated with honors (magna cum laude) from Cleveland State University, August 2002.
Or,
Bachelor�s degree with honors in Computer and Information Science. Graduated magna cum laude from Cleveland State University, August 2002.
That way I'm covered in case people don't know that 'magna cum laude' means with honors.
[ September 24, 2002: Message edited by: Dave Vick ]
 
Frank Carver
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Am I to assume that you don't typically get any other sort of "grades" for a degree in the USA?
Over here we can get several grades of batchelor degree: pass (the default), third-class honours (usually just mentioned as "honours" or "hons"), lower second class honours ("2.2" or "2.ii"), upper second class honours ("2.1" or "2.i"), and first class honours ("1st").
As you may see on my own resum� I graduated with a lower second class honours degree. It still irks me a little when I see jobs advertised asking for a 2.1 or 1st
Is it just the regular degree and "magna cum laude" where you studied ?
 
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In US universities, when you graduate with honors your degree is typically adorned with one of three signifiers, depending on GPA.
Cum Laude : GPA 3.50 - 3.74
Magna Cum Laude : GPA 3.75 - 3.89
Summa Cum Laude : GPA 3.90 - 4.00
 
Dave Vick
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Over here, as far as I know, a degree is a degree. You get a degree but can get honors based on your grade point average. I don't think there is any standard as to what GPA value you have to attain to receive a specific type of honor. Where I gaduated from, Cleveland State University, it is like this:
3.30-3.59 Cum Laude
3.60-3.79 Magna Cum Laude
3.80-4.00 Summa Cum Laude
based on a scale where an A is 4 points, a B is 3, a C 2 points, and a D is 1.
I think I've seen other university where the honors are awarded based on different levels. This might be similiar to what you're describing Frank but I've never seen a job posted asking for only people that have attained a specific level of graduation honors.
 
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As another Brit I confess that I was also slightly baffled by this magna cum laude stuff, (schoolboy latin gave me an approx translation). I've been out of college for far too many years now but I still put my degree classification on my CV. However, I don't use my post-nominal letters, (any of them). It may just be me but when I see a CV with something like, "Joe Bloggs Bsc (Hons), Msc, MBCS, CEng", I just cringe. Could it be an English affection to look down on obvious boasting?
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Dave Vick:
Over here, as far as I know, a degree is a degree. You get a degree but can get honors based on your grade point average. I don't think there is any standard as to what GPA value you have to attain to receive a specific type of honor.


It really does vary by school. At Harvard, for exmaple, rampand grade inflation has caused over 90% of the undergrads to graduate with honors (this was from an article I read). MIT, on the other hand,actively fights against grade inflation, and regularly gives plenty of C's to its students.
It's interesting that both Harvard and MIT take the same view, but choose different actions. Both feel that their students are in the top 5% and would get honors at most other universities. At Harvard, the simply inflate grades so nearly everyone gets honors. At MIT, they reset the scale, and simply don't give honors because MIT considers it unfair to the B/C students, who would get get honors elsewhere. The belief is that the MIT degree alone is valuable enough as is.
--Mark
 
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Frank Carver wrote:Am I to assume that you don't typically get any other sort of "grades" for a degree in the USA?  
Over here we can get several grades of batchelor degree: pass (the default), third-class honours (usually just mentioned as "honours" or "hons"), lower second class honours ("2.2" or "2.ii"), upper second class honours ("2.1" or "2.i"), and first class honours ("1st").
As you may see on my own resum� I graduated with a lower second class honours degree.  It still irks me a little when I see jobs advertised asking for a 2.1 or 1st    
Is it just the regular degree and "magna cum laude" where you studied ?



Does the degree classification still matter when you have so much experience? You were a professional programmer when I wasn't born yet!
 
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I think the general ranking in the USA is "vanilla" (average or below grades), cum laude (literally, "with honors"), magna cum laude (with great honors) and summa cum laude (with all honors). And at least locally, the honors level was based on your grade point average, Though offhand, I don't know what GPA went with what or if there were additional ways to earn honors beside grades.

Regardless, while a "4.0" looks good on a résumé, "magna cum laude" definitely attracts attention. Though if it's MCL in pre-human studies it probably won't carry the weight that one in Computer Science would.

And, speaking of an over-achiever myself, you may get stereotyped as an insufferable geek anyway.
 
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