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Computer Science Degrees

 
Greenhorn
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Hello.
I recently graduated with a BBA in "Computer Information Systems. I learned elementary database techniques, java and C++.
However, this degree was NOT a computer science degree. I did not learn the topics that most colleges with computer science degrees offer such as automata theory, software engineering concepts, algorithm fundamentals, mathematical programming, etc.
My question is, should I go to graduate school and take a Master of Science in Computer Science to learn all the things that the BBA didnt teach me?
Is that needed to get a job in computer programming?
Also, does anyone know of any good graduate schools in New York?
 
Ranch Hand
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IMHO, if I had it to do over, I'd stay out of the programming business.
Fix cars, the pay rates are better.
 
Greenhorn
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Agreed......too many qualified developers...not enough dev jobs.
 
Jimmy Owens
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What do you guys mean?
This whole place is about programming isnt it?
Or do you mean the market of programming jobs in C++ specifically is dead?
IT is the field that is dead IMO.
All those cisco and MCSE guys are unemployed. But I always thought ecommerce development jobs were plentiful.
java, xml, c++.net, etc.
anyway, can anyone answer the computer degrees question? thanks!
 
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Jimmy:
- The MS-Comp Sci degree will be even more theoretical that the BS-Comp Sci degree. What college does is prepare you how to "solve problems" - at least that's what I think it's supposed to do.
- I hope that you did some "real-world" projects or "internships" while earning your degree. This is where you get your initial "experience".
- The guys in the J2EE Java field that I know of - learned it on their own, and not as part of any formalized college curriculum.
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- Right now, as you already know - the IT market is pretty slow - especially in the Junior Java programmer market.
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- I see that you have four options:
1. Look for a Java or C++ programming job.
2. If option #1 does not work out - look for job in production support / maintenance. Even if it's working with COBOL mainframes, at least you are in the computer field.
3. If option #2 does not work out. Go to graduate school. While in grad school, make damned sure that you get some "real world" Java or C++ (your choice) projects under your belt through the University.
4. If option #3 does not work out. Then it's time to back off and review your situation. Perhaps working in another field - while learning the J2EE model (Servlets, JSP, XML, EJB).
Hopefully, the market will have turned around. And the folks who looked to the Java field to make a "quick buck" will have moved onto something else - thus opening up opportunites for you.
No matter what - you will need to continually study to maintain and update your skill set. Reason why J2EE programmers get paid the $$ range that they do. We are constantly studying, going to classes, updating our skill set.
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Note: It's not the basic Java (as seen on the SJCP2) that makes you the $$. Rather, it's just a step on the road to the J2EE model (Servlets, JSP, EJBs). It's the J2EE model that makes companies and eventually you the $$.
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So how do you achieve this.
1. While either in school or out of school - prepare for the SCJP2 exam. Then prepare for the SCWCD exam. Then the SCJD exam.
These (along with your BS-CS degree) will help get your foot in the door.
Once you have a few yrs under your belt - go for the SCJEA exam.
--------
John Coxey
(jpcoxey@aol.com)
[ October 23, 2002: Message edited by: John Coxey ]
 
John Coxey
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Arghhh!!!
I thought you had the BS-CS degree.
If you are going for an MS-CS degree, the college will more than likely make you pickup quite a few of the CS classes required for the BS-CS degree.
Definitely grab Data Structurs, Algorithms, OOA&D programming, and any Java classes that you can.
John Coxey
(jpcoxey@aol.com)
 
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