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i passed scjp 1.2 now what's out there for me...

 
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what's out there for me now that i'm an scjp(81%)? i'm 31 years old with no professional experience... i spent the years working as an account exec then a process operator and at some time unemployed... i was gearing to be a programmer for years and because of a mistake i was took away from it and things add up.
i had dipped into visual basic but not deep enough and finally i discovered NIIT and learned Java among other good things and now i'm certified... i know the IT job market even in it's lows is still a good industry but for whom..? the young? how about the "late bloomers" like me?
i was given the impression that i'm too old for a starter... in programming. geez i'm not that old and i'm not senile. i have come a long way to get this far and i don't like a locked door and a snob manservant when i come knocking...
i don't like to quit but if the industry thinks otherwise... i still won't quit. but please tell me something that would atleast blow away the dark clouds over my head or that would definitely cut my head off.
 
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What is this misconception everyone has about this being a young industry? Startups are mostly a young man's game, because a startup presumes excessive hours. Younger workers, who have stammina and do not have families, are better suited to that life. but there's much more to our industry then startups.
The other reason, as far as I can tell, that people think this is a young man's game, is because HR depts and pointy haired bosses have their heads so far up their assess, they only know about technologies which receive high fanfair, i.e. the hot new technologies/products from MS, Oracle, Tibco, etc.
For whom is this a good industry? It's a good industry for the smart people. Any thinking based industry is good for smart people, and our indsutry certainly qualifies as one. If you're smart, good comapnies will want you. If you're smart, you can learn new technoligies quickly, because you'll realize that they aren't so different from old technologies.
Bottom line, if you're smart, and willing to make an effort, you'll do fine in this indsutry.
--Mark
 
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Thirty one is under the cut off line, you're
still young enough. You need some experience in
this market. Either you need knowledge of a
business domain or some relevant experience on a
programming assignment.
From employers propective they say this guy is 22
and this guy is 31. We have a longer potential
with the 22 guy. On the other hand 31 is more
mature and likely to be less impulsive.
Around here advice is often to work for free on
an open source project to get experience. It's
costly to work for free, though.
It could help if you had inside connections.
You could add more certificates. More J2EE,
networking, database, system admin and XML
cetificates are attractive additions to your
resume.
 
Rufus BugleWeed
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What is this misconception everyone has about this being a young industry?


Matloff clearly presents the age discrimination case. You are sticking your head
in the sand if you are not seeing it in the
market.
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Rufus BugleWeed:

Matloff clearly presents the age discrimination case. You are sticking your head
in the sand if you are not seeing it in the
market.


"Clearly presents" is a matter of opinion and on with which I do not concur. I disagree with his research questions and do not accept the interpretation of the answers. Disagreeing is not "sticking my head in the sand," it's having my own free will to make my own evaluation and decisions.

--Mark
 
Rufus BugleWeed
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Have you conducted any research or can you
cite any sources to support your opinion?
Your credentials are
impressive but there's not much
experience in HR, legal or demonstrated competency
in this issue.
I'd like to believe your opinion, but I'm finding
your credibility weak in comparison to Matloff's.
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Rufus BugleWeed:
Have you conducted any research or can you
cite any sources to support your opinion?


No research of my own. If I get time, I'll look for some other studies.

Originally posted by Rufus BugleWeed:

Your credentials are
impressive but there's not much
experience in HR, legal or demonstrated competency
in this issue.


Just a hiring manager for about 6 months. But even that doesn't really count, since it's still mostly a single data point. I think studies are the best way to go in this area.

Originally posted by Rufus BugleWeed:

I'd like to believe your opinion, but I'm finding
your credibility weak in comparison to Matloff's.


Fair enough. :-)

--Mark
 
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Hi Benjoe,
i have experienced a similar situation as you have now and i just want to give you some advice based on my experience:
1) scjp2 is not enough-- you must continue to add more certifications/learn new languages-- in this IT Field, learning is a lifelong process-- employers nowadays need you to be able to do a lot of different things.
2)consider looking for a testing position-- usually that's the best way to get some experience and you can frequently parlay that into the type of programming/development experience you need.
3) Some of the previous posters tell you that if you are smart employers will want you -- but how do you demonstrate that you are indeed as smart as you claim to be? -- there are very few objective measures of smartness out there but---you can:
a) get certifications that are somewhat difficult to get--like the Developer/Architect certifications
b) get an advanced degree and shoot for the best GPA you can get-- i did that -- it did take some time but now i work for a fortune 100 IT company and I am not stopping there.--I came into the IT field at the age of 27 by what a lot of people say i would be too old at that age --but if you are motivated enough you can get to where you want to be. ---just my $.02 --- ideas anyone?
 
Benjoe Reyes
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thanks guys
 
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