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Is there anywhere in the US where 2 years exp => job?

 
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I'm in Silicon Valley with 2 years experience, mostly in Java. My current work is drying up and I need to find a new job fast. However, it seems as though I could apply for jobs in Silicon Valley until I drop dead without getting a reply. Is there another part of the US where I might have a better chance of being hired?
Thanks,
B
 
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Dallas area?? - maybe!
 
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Ben:
- Try the defense contractors.
- Might mean a move to the east coast (DC/Balt).
- Look at www.brassring.com
- Also, might be some listings (non-defense) at www.jobcircle.com Enter Philadelphia, PA or Pittsburgh, PA for the city.
John Coxey
(jpcoxey@aol.com)
 
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As John indicated, the DC/MD/VA area is pretty good. As long as you are a US citizen with a clean background that is. About a year ago, a friend of mine with no programming experience and no security clearance got hired on with a defense contractor here right out of college, and he was in his 30's so it wasn't even a question of youth. Check out the jobs section of The Washington Post, The Washington Times, or The Baltimore Sun.
 
Ben Smith
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Thanks for the advice. Unfortunately I'm a Green Card-holder rather than a U.S. Citizen, but I still see a lot more jobs suited for my skills on the East Coast.
 
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Green card holders may still get clearence. I had a friend at MIT who was a French national (although he grew up in the US, so I think he had a green card). He talked to the NSA (who are more paranoid then anyone about security) and was told that he was eligible to work for them because "France is not a hostile country." (I guess no one from the NSA has ever vacationed there :-)
While I suspect most contract houses won't be aware of subtleties, I believe that they can, in theory, employ you.
--Mark
 
Ben Smith
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Are you saying that if a job states "U.S. Citizen required" that I should still apply? (I'm a U.K. Citizen).
 
Mark Herschberg
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http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/osc/htm/911discrim.htm

What is Citizenship Status Discrimination?
Citizenship status discrimination occurs when individuals are not hired or are fired because of their real or perceived immigration or citizenship status, or because of their type of work authorization. U.S. citizens, refugees, asylees, many permanent residents and certain temporary residents are protected from citizenship status discrimination. U.S. citizen-only hiring policies are generally unlawful. Employers may not refuse to hire refugees or asylees because their work authorization has an expiration date.

 
Jason Menard
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U.S. citizen-only hiring policies are generally unlawful.


AFAIK, the exceptions revolve around DOD security clearance issues. According to their web pages, the NSA and CIA preclude non-citizens from employment, and the FBI precludes non-citizens from employment as special agents.
The directive governing who can get a DoD security clearance is Department of Defense Directive 5200.2: DoD Personnel Security Program[pdf].
In order to obtain a DoD clearance, apparently you must be free from foreign influence and foreign preference, so in general it seems you must be a US citizen. However as with everything in the government, there are exceptions:

As an exception, a non-U.S. citizen may be assigned to sensitive duties or granted a Limited Access Authorization for access to classified information in support of a specific DoD program, project, or contract that cannot be filled by a cleared or clearable U.S. citizen provided it is approved by an authorized official (as specified in DoD 5200.2-R, reference (i)).


It can never hurt to try though. The most they can do is say no. Best of luck to you.
 
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Also, keep in mind that the U.K. is a country that we have a VERY special relationship with. The U.K., Canada, Austrialia, and New Zeland are the only four countries that we are precluded by law from spying on, from what I remember from College. In fact, if you were to believe everyone but the NSA, we have a electronic survaliance network (ECHELON) that only the US, UK, Austrialia, New Zeland, and Canada participate in, although that has not been confirmed by the NSA
Oh the fun stuff I learned in College
Jon
 
John Coxey
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Ben:
The bottom line being:
- If you are applying directly to a defense contractor, such as Raytheon or Lockheed-Martin, then go ahead and apply.
- Send a cover letter describing your circumstances.

- You may want to send a letter of inquiry to the HR folks at one of the defense contractors. Explain your situation regarding green card holder status. Don't mention that you are looking for work - as they'll just chuck your inquiry into the trash. All you want is information (for the inquiry letter).
- As for headhunters. That's a tough one. I would say call them up and explain your situation. I would expect 75% of them to just plain say no (due to ignorance). But the better ones out there (who know the rules/etc) might be able to help. Never know.
-----
- The real bottom line: If you are interested in the position - fire them a resume. The most they can say is no.
- I play that game - even if they say they want 500 languages, 100 yrs experience, 12 PhD's and whatever else they can dream up. If it's interesting - I fire them off a resume. I'll learn more about the job at the first phone call.
John Coxey
(jpcoxey@aol.com)
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Jason Menard:

AFAIK, the exceptions revolve around DOD security clearance issues. According to their web pages, the NSA and CIA preclude non-citizens from employment, and the FBI precludes non-citizens from employment as special agents.


Yes, this is true, but look back at my earlier posting. The NSA was willing to hire a friend of mine who is French. I suspect that UK citizens would also be acceptable.
--Mark
 
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