This week's book giveaway is in the Agile and Other Processes forum.
We're giving away four copies of Real-World Software Development: A Project-Driven Guide to Fundamentals in Java and have Dr. Raoul-Gabriel Urma & Richard Warburton on-line!
See this thread for details.
Win a copy of Real-World Software Development: A Project-Driven Guide to Fundamentals in Java this week in the Agile and Other Processes forum!
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academic experience

 
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How much value does working part time in a school add to a resume. I am doing my masters (first semester), and I just finished a 3 month part time job in campus where I developed a VB.Net application. And now i have another contract where I am working with SVG to startwith.
So can I include all these experiences(part time) in my resume?? If yes, should I categorise my experience as academic and indusrty. I do have a full time experience of 19 months as a Java developer before I entered school.
Shankar.
 
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It helps. How much really depends on the position. Was this some small part time project for a research group, or were you fully involved, just part time, in some commerical product? In either case, list it on your resume.
--Mark
 
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Shankar:
YES!!! YES!!! YES!!!
By all means, put your college experiences on your resume.
This is what separates you from all the other schmucks trying to get into the game. You went out, and grabbed an opportunity. Now you have something to talk about with the interviewer.
Hopefully your projects will be in the language you want to code in. But even include the projects that were done in obscure languages - especially if you did design work on them.
For those obscure language projects (that use Lisp, Prolog, or Eiffel for example), concentrate more on the design process (in your resume).
----
While you are working on college projects - start networking. Find out the other team members - learn from them. If you are working with a real-world coporation, then go to their place of business and meet with folks.
Heck, hold your design meetings at their place of business. Now you have visibilty and exposure to real-world programmers and management.
Talk with management, you never, ever, ever, ever know where an opportunity is just waiting for someone with your skill set.
----
Again, talk with the career services folks at your college. See what's available - might be someone with another short-term project that you can do in school.
Alwas, always, always be looking for opportunity.
----
You are definitely on the right track with the projects in college. See if you can get academic credit for them. Keep the momentum going.
Also, while doing projects. Think of how you are preparing for interview. Perhaps you want to make screenshots or some UML design docs.
Create a small portfolio. You may be able to show it at interview. Perhaps at the 2nd round of interviews - when they have more time to talk with you.
I would not create a web-site to showcase your portfolio as no one has time to visit it. At interview-time, the folks will be deciding their hire/no-hire decision at that time. Not when they go back to their cube/office/box, and surf the net to see your site.
I know, a little off topic. But I like to ramble. Hey, it's free advice - don't knock it.
Gotta run,
John Coxey
(jpcoxey@aol.com)
 
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Originally posted by shankar vembu:
How much value does working part time in a school add to a resume. I am doing my masters (first semester), and I just finished a 3 month part time job in campus where I developed a VB.Net application. And now i have another contract where I am working with SVG to startwith.
So can I include all these experiences(part time) in my resume?? If yes, should I categorise my experience as academic and indusrty. I do have a full time experience of 19 months as a Java developer before I entered school.
Shankar.


Its been my impression that people seem to give little importance to college projects during interviews or other discussions. However, I suspect that if you could demo the project or give them the source code at the interview, that might change their opinion. The first job I got in programming (no experience, not even a CS major) I gave them a COBOL report and source code for several school projects and I think that helped a lot.
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by herb slocomb:

Its been my impression that people seem to give little importance to college projects during interviews or other discussions.


This is true, because most college projects emphasize academic ideas whereas companies want to hire you for development skills, which are not promoted by such projects. However there is a difference between academic research software, and holding a job developing commercial software, while you happen to be attending college.

--Mark
 
John Coxey
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Mark & Herb:
- The fact is - doing a college project will give the candidate something relevant to talk about.
Now he can build his success stories (key to successful interviewing) on something relevant to the industry.
For that ever elusive first job - anything you can do helps. Granted, an internship or employment with real-world outfit helps out alot more than just research projects.
But again, every little bit helps.
-----------
I know the Osh-Kosh Java internship project I did sure opened up the doors to the Java world for me. Sure, it wasn't the only thing. But, was one of the many pieces in the larger picture.
John Coxey
(jpcoxey@aol.com)
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by John Coxey:
Mark & Herb:
- The fact is - doing a college project will give the candidate something relevant to talk about.


I never said don't do it or don't list it, just that I put a higher premium on corporate work. Of course, I value academic work over no work at all.
--Mark
 
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