Win a copy of React Cookbook: Recipes for Mastering the React Framework this week in the HTML Pages with CSS and JavaScript forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Ron McLeod
  • Paul Clapham
  • Rob Spoor
  • Liutauras Vilda
Sheriffs:
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Junilu Lacar
  • Tim Cooke
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Holloway
  • Piet Souris
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Moores
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Frits Walraven
  • Himai Minh

Work with a recruiter or go it alone

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 33
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
After 7 years with the same company I have decided it is time to move on. Is it better to work with a recruiter\agency or stay on my own to find a new position? I have been with my present employer since college graduation so I have never been in this position before. Thanks for any input.
 
Author
Posts: 6055
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's better to do both!
Why restrict your avenues? Look on your own. But at the same time, find a recruiter or two and ahve them look for you.
There is no direct cost for you to use a recruiter. The company pays the fee (usually 25% of your base salary).
Just be careful in choosing them. Some recruiters are simply used car sales men (quite a few in fact), but there are some good ones out there. Also, many recruiters will say, once you start working with them, "and if there's a company you're interested in, let us know, and we'll contact them on your behalf." I never do. On the plus side, they might be better at negotiating then you are,* on the down side, many companies don't want to deal with recruiters, and might blow them off, and any subsequent resume from you.
*I've met many who don't know the first thing about negotiating salary. Remember, there's no training required to be a recruiter.

--Mark
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 204
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Also, many recruiters will say, once you start working with them, "and if there's a company you're interested in, let us know, and we'll contact them on your behalf."


In such cases if u go ahead without the recruiter you get 100% of your salary ofcourse but also know that if u go through the recruiter you get only about 80% to 90% of your pay.
In the event that the recruiter finds one for you, the recruiter keeps upto 35% of your salary.
-ST
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 284
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
there are a few good guys who keep as little as zero percent of your salary - they just require a finder's fee from the company that hires you.
a friend who is a designer found a company like this only after a few years.
there is also sometimes a hassle if you go through a recruiter, land a contract, you do it, then they have another piece of work ready to go, but they have to go through the recruiter who may or may not choose you for the job even though the company likes you.
i think the advice of 'use both methods' (your own effort and a recuiter) sounds like the best approach.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1551
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think you should give serious second thought on throwing in the towel after seven years. If you think the ship is sinking that's one thing. If you're bored, malcontented, or hating your boss, waiting till the market picks up might be a better course. Last guy on, first guy off ...
Tackling the problem at your current employer might be an even better course. These days domain knowledge is getting to be more and more valuable.
$0.02
 
Mark Herschberg
Author
Posts: 6055
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Originally posted by San Tiruvan:

In such cases if u go ahead without the recruiter you get 100% of your salary ofcourse but also know that if u go through the recruiter you get only about 80% to 90% of your pay.
In the event that the recruiter finds one for you, the recruiter keeps upto 35% of your salary.


Well, it depends what type of job. The implicit assumption in my answer is that it was for full time employment. In those cases, the employer pays the recruiter (25% is standard).
If it's a contract job, then often, the employer pays the recruiter's company and they pay you. The overhead that the recruiter gets can be anywhere from 15-50%.

--Mark
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 31
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi,
I was a recruiter recently in Southern California, miserable job let me tell you. Very monotonous, boring, and a lot of cut-throats out there.
First of all, I agree w/ the poster who said to consider staying where you're at unless things are impossible there. I am trying steadfastly to transition into the IT field, and man, is it tough!!
If you must move on, I definitely encourage you to use recruiters and do as much as you can on your own. That means putting your resume on all the boards, ie Monster, Dice, etc. Also, try to connect w/ GOOD recruiters. In a sense they are like any other profession in that you have to weed out the good ones from the bad. If you can, try to ask for references.
I would always try to find jobs by yourself first. That does keep most of the money in your pocket. The markup can be even higher than 50%, it's basically as much as the recruiter can get. We had one guy work at a local client's IT dept for two months. Per our contract, we billed 165/hour for a UNIX Admin. We paid him 70.00/hour. For two months we made about 1300 each between two recruiters(we split everything) until his contract ended!!
Also, in your job search process some very unethical recruiters will call you up and ask for job leads. Hang up on them immediately!!! They are snakes asking for job leads so they can submit people to the jobs you apply for behind your back. All they care about is getting the placement. They will talk to you like they're your buddy and can be very slick about it. Often times they will just contact you and go over your profile, then ask if you have interviewed elsewhere. A dead giveaway is that they DO NOT have a specific job to refer you to. That is always my first question to them. I had two try to pull that kind of crap w/ me, Remington and Atlantis Partners. Stay away from those types. Good luck.
DDAVE
 
Something must be done about this. Let's start by reading this tiny ad:
the value of filler advertising in 2021
https://coderanch.com/t/730886/filler-advertising
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic