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my job changed for better or worse?

 
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my job description use to be design, develop, test, java applications. i would implement business requirements using java. my employer changed direction and has gone towards using 3rd party tools instead of custom software. now my job is now to analyze a business process and re-engineer it to use the 3rd party tool. of course, i have to learn the 3rd party tool and implement the new process using it.
career wise, do you guys think i am better off now? My knowledge of this 3rd party tool will be useless as soon as the next version comes out. java knowledge would be useful longer and for more companies but it is starting to be seen as a commodity. maybe the business analysis skills are more valuable than java coding or knowledge of this 3rd party tool?
 
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Depends on the 3rd party tool and how widely adopted it has become. This does seem to be the way most IT is going.
 
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Programming is becoming a commodity market. They engineers of the future who will add value will be those who have the business skills. Anyone can write code, and given good requirements, they can do it anywhere. What;s hard is getting those requirements and running a project. Those jobs cannot be outsourced easily.

Originally posted by Matt Dole:
career wise, do you guys think i am better off now? My knowledge of this 3rd party tool will be useless as soon as the next version comes out.


With that attitude, yes, your knowledge will be useless. The key is to learn the larger lessons from using a tool. If you know one IDE, you know them all. Don't worry about the particulars. Comapnies which do care about details for tools are not those you want to work for, anyway.
--Mark
 
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I agree Mark's opinion,work hard.....
 
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....

The key is to learn the larger lessons from using a tool. If you know one IDE, you know them all. Don't worry about the particulars. Comapnies which do care about details for tools are not those you want to work for, anyway.



Well said Mark...and I hope that hiring personnel will also take into consideration that Coding in a Windows environment is not much different than coding in a Unix environment
 
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Originally posted by San Tiruvan:
coding in a Windows environment is not much different than coding in a Unix environment

I would say that really it depends on the job. If the employer needs someone that already knows the ins and outs of the Windows API then there is a big difference.
The bigger question would be what is the employer's actual needs versus their perceived needs...
 
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Originally posted by San Tiruvan:
....

Well said Mark...and I hope that hiring personnel will also take into consideration that Coding in a Windows environment is not much different than coding in a Unix environment


Unfortunately I have seen way too many jobs posted that specify having worked on Java in a certain environment(UNIX vs Windows) using a particular server(Websphere vs Weblogic). It seems like employers are being more specific about not only how much Java experience you have, but what environment you have experience with. It sucks.
[ March 24, 2003: Message edited by: Chad McGowan ]
 
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Originally posted by Chad McGowan:

Unfortunately I have seen way too many jobs posted that specify having worked on Java in a certain environment(UNIX vs Windows) using a particular server(Websphere vs Weblogic). It seems like employers are being more specific about not only how much Java experience you have, but what environment you have experience with. It sucks.
[ March 24, 2003: Message edited by: Chad McGowan ]



It was true when I was job-hunting back in 1988 and it's still true. Companies advertise for specific levels of experience with specific releases of specific products. The tighter the economy the longer the list, but the one thing I've never seen them give credit for was intelligence or ability to learn.
Many times they demand more years of experience than anyone who hadn't been on the orignal design team could ever honestly claim and/or a complex mix of skills that is statistically unlikely to be found in a single person.
Not being very good at lying about such things, this means that I've never managed to get a job simply in response to an advertised position. I always needed to know someone inside who could get me past the HR "wall".
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Tim Holloway:
It was true when I was job-hunting back in 1988 and it's still true. Companies advertise for specific levels of experience with specific releases of specific products. The tighter the economy the longer the list, but the one thing I've never seen them give credit for was intelligence or ability to learn.


You see it as a negative, I see it as a positive.
Companies which hire based on these checklists generally don't have good HR deparments. Companies with bad HR departments are usually not well run/managed. I don't want to work for those companies. When I see such a list, I simply see a big red flag, and move on without wasting my time. (Obviously there are exceptions, to this, as with any "rule.")
The good comapnies take a little effort to find, but given the amount of time you spend at your job, it's worth the investment.
--Mark
 
Chad McGowan
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

You see it as a negative, I see it as a positive.
Companies which hire based on these checklists generally don't have good HR deparments. Companies with bad HR departments are usually not well run/managed. I don't want to work for those companies. When I see such a list, I simply see a big red flag, and move on without wasting my time. (Obviously there are exceptions, to this, as with any "rule.")
The good comapnies take a little effort to find, but given the amount of time you spend at your job, it's worth the investment.
--Mark


I agree that if a company thinks you must have experience coding EJB's using JBuilder 7.0, you probably don't want to work for them anyway.
However, when you are searching for employment, you want to have as many options as possible. There may be several reasons for these lists:
1)Maybe the company just has a bad HR rep.
2)Maybe the job requirements come from their corporate office and don't reflect the actual position.
3)Maybe they don't really expect someone to meet all the requirements on the list.
I have been in the market for about three weeks and from what I have seen so far, these checklists are the norm, not the exception.
I haven't automatically eliminated these companies from my search, instead I send them a resume along with a cover letter explaining why I think I'm qualified.
If the job description demands 2 years of experience on Websphere, I explain that I have 3 years of experience on several different app servers and really feel that I can quickly adapt to Websphere.
If they demand 5 years of experience on Oracle, I note that I have 3 years of Oracle along with 2 years of SQL Server...
My hope is that the really good companies will see that someone with the ability to learn and adapt to different technologies is a better choice. My fear is that some of these letters and resumes never make it past the HR person.
 
I have gone to look for myself. If I should return before I get back, keep me here with this tiny ad:
Java file APIs (DOC, XLS, PDF, and many more)
https://products.aspose.com/total/java
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