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Managerial degree....

 
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Dear ranchers,
what is your opinion of a "techie" going for a managerial degree, in a premiere institute, in terms of the scope other than becoming a consultant.
Also would like to know, A doctoral Vs a Managerial degree in terms of scope,saleability(NOT scalability), whats the spelling any way
, i mean selling ability in terms of a carrer scope .
Any replies other than , it depends [ ] are welcome.
 
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!depends
:roll:
 
aadhi agathi
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may i know on what/which/why/how/where/when
please answer with enough decoupling from reality
 
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It depends on
1)Courses you take and your grades
2)Ranking of that 'premier' institute in your country.
3)market situation when you will complete the course.
4)Your previous experience.
5)Quality of other people competing with you in the market!
6)Your interest in managing the people in the organization.
I think Doctoral degree requires much patience and takes minimum 3 years in CS to complete.Salarywise it really depends .
[ April 04, 2003: Message edited by: rahul rege ]
[ April 04, 2003: Message edited by: rahul rege ]
 
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Well, let's like asking your opinion of serving smores.* It's good food to bring on a camping trip, but probably not right to serve at a funeral.
If you want to go into management, then I think a MBA can be a strong addition to a BS. I've been talking with a number of professors who teach MBAs and opinions vary as to how useful MBAs will be for tech people 10-20 years from now. They seem about 65-35 for getting the degree. Of course, an MBA from a school outside the top 10-20 probably isn't worthwhile.
Now if you want to stay technical (as in detailed technical) and continue to code or be architect, it probably won't be worthwhile.
As for a PhD, well, that's like comparing soup to the smores--they're not even in the same class. If you want to do R&D, get a PhD. If you want to go into management, get a MBA.
--Mark

*For those not familiar with them, it's a "sandwich" of graham crackers, chocolate and marshmellows, that you traditionally roast over a campfire (or these days make in a mircowave).
[ April 04, 2003: Message edited by: Mark Herschberg ]
 
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I would go to MBA program if i really want to pursue the higher education.
As CS serves industry, MBA does same thing in terms of career and money. After laying off from Bell/Motolorola/IBM lab something like that, one's chance might be one should be looking for the totally not experienced area as a sales people or an engineer. That's not just matter of money but can be painful experiences, either.
Besides, what do you do in Onion like layers of layers in the big lab as a newbie PHD graduate? you must be part of small segment in the big company project. This was true when i heard the tale from my friend, who is in the DSP alogrithm layer in the one of the premier laboratory in the country. The guy told me he thought he knows something about his area right after PHD, but he realised he doesn't know almost anything about the other layer. it means he doesn't know what he is doing in a big spectrum of his company project.
The chance i would consider pursuing CS PHD is in case i am a real "Tehcnology Hungry Nerd", who can ignore family matter and my hobbies over smelly monitor through my life time.
I would go to (applied) Mathematics or Physics
area if i really like academia R&D not for money. At least, those areas look deals with much more profound academic spirit than chasing the project for the money directly.
But that's only my personal preference.
peace
[ April 05, 2003: Message edited by: stephen Kang ]
 
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
Well, let's like asking your opinion of serving smores.* It's good food to bring on a camping trip, but probably not right to serve at a funeral.
If you want to go into management, then I think a MBA can be a strong addition to a BS. I've been talking with a number of professors who teach MBAs and opinions vary as to how useful MBAs will be for tech people 10-20 years from now. They seem about 65-35 for getting the degree. Of course, an MBA from a school outside the top 10-20 probably isn't worthwhile.
Now if you want to stay technical (as in detailed technical) and continue to code or be architect, it probably won't be worthwhile.
As for a PhD, well, that's like comparing soup to the smores--they're not even in the same class. If you want to do R&D, get a PhD. If you want to go into management, get a MBA.
--Mark

*For those not familiar with them, it's a "sandwich" of graham crackers, chocolate and marshmellows, that you traditionally roast over a campfire (or these days make in a mircowave).
[ April 04, 2003: Message edited by: Mark Herschberg ]


I agree with most of what mark said with few caveats. Everything degree you take has to be paid for.Unless your employer pays, getting an MBA is not an easy proposition. the average top 20 MBA (at least in US) costs about $100,000, how do you pay for that?.You have to consider what the return on investment is. If you already have significant loans(grad/undergrad), an MBA is just not a viable option.You graduate saddled with immense debt which defeats one of the goals of the MBA: to increase your earnings and earnings potential.
If you have a trust fund of course all these considerations do not apply.
 
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Hi,
For aspiring MBA, make sure that you can motivate people. Inspire people to do the works for you. There are a lot of works for a manager. If you can not learn to motivate people, you can not delegate the works out to anybody.
I have ran across many MBA/Ex-Engineers, the numbers and figures are excellent. But have the problem of delegate the workload out to subordinate. Eventually, the managers get less and less rosy projects. The vacuum area is replaced with MBS - 'S' does not stand for science. The MBA dedicated team members will suffocate as well.
Thanks,
MCao
 
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