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which parts of java you dont like?

 
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Recently , one of my friends attend one Java intervirew. The first qustion he faced is "which parts of java , you dont like and what is the reason for that"
My friend started telling 1) lack of multipe inheritance
2) Learning for Swing ..
3) low speed..
etc..
But the interviewer is not very much convinced with his answers... So , I thought , it is the best place to discuss to find the best answers.
Any thoughts?
 
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Well, there may be better forums for this, but since it was an interview question, it's welcome here, as well.
Do you know why the interviewer didn't like the answers? Lack of multiple inheritence is a very common answer to that question.
"Speed" was a common answer 5 years ago, but with modern JITs there is very little difference between Java and C for most applications. When I hear an answer like that, I usually press for more info, so see if the interviewee knows what Java's speed really is, or is just repeating some third hand info he got from another developer.
--Mark
 
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As far as the performance issues go, AWT/Swing based Applets still frequently crash my browser, and there is a noticeable lag in response to mouse actions on desktop applications...non-Java GUI's respond noticeably faster for me.
This is on a P4 1700mHz Workstation with 2 gigs of RAM.
If anyone has any advice on configuring my system to get Java GUI's to run more smoothly, I am all ears...
 
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All:
- I think questuon could be parlayed into, "What featres of Java would you like to see implemented in a future release?"
- I for one would like to see entire -classpath thing go away.
- Would like to see "regular expressions" like those in JavaScript. We have an e-mail field for both an applicant and co-applicant on our credit-application screens (Internet based), and it's a bear to check for a valid (syntax wise) email address in Java.
- Yes, there are some "regular expression" libraries for Java, but don't have time to verify that they work correctly.
- Want to see "regular expressions" as part of mainstream Java in the JDK. And then be able to grab an O'Reilly text and copy the regular expression for valid e-mail addresses.
-----------
- Another issue, when using static fields that are called by other classes. When I change the class that contains the static fields, I want the classes that call them to automatically pick up the changes.
- In JDK1.7 (Yeah - we still use it in production), the static member changes are not picked up unless we force compile the entire project. Meaning, erase the *.class files and the re-compile.
----------
- Those are my two gripes / wishes for suggestions for Java for this week.
Johnny
 
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Originally posted by John Coxey:
All:
- I think questuon could be parlayed into, "What featres of Java would you like to see implemented in a future release?"
Johnny


I would like to see destructors, not for memory management but because it allows better code designs.
 
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Want to see "regular expressions" as part of mainstream Java in the JDK. And then be able to grab an O'Reilly text and copy the regular expression for valid e-mail addresses.
John Coxey, meet JDK 1.4. Enjoy...
In JDK1.7 (Yeah - we still use it in production),
Still? Ummm... OK. I wish the rest of us were that far behind. Or perhaps I should be asking you for stock tips.
As for the original question - to understand the interviewer's mindset, it may help to know what sort of company/position the interview was for. For example, if they do a lot of J2EE stuff, complaints about Swing's complexity or slowness may be seen as irrelevant, and indications that your Java experience is predominantly in areas of little interest to them. Or not.
[ April 11, 2003: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
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Originally posted by Glenn Opdycke-Hansen:
I would like to see destructors, not for memory management but because it allows better code designs.


Java already has finalizers, what's wrong with them (besides the fact they I hardly ever see situations where they are needed)? I hope you are not suggesting that Java should allow explicit memory management...
BTW, why do you feel destructors help design?
[ April 11, 2003: Message edited by: Chris Mathews ]
 
Glenn Opdycke-Hansen
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Originally posted by Chris Mathews:

Java already has finalizers, what's wrong with them (besides the fact they I hardly ever see situations where they are needed)? I hope you are not suggesting that Java should allow explicit memory management...
BTW, why do you feel destructors help design?
[ April 11, 2003: Message edited by: Chris Mathews ]


finalizers are not immediate and predictable. Does anyone use them?
The designs permitted by destructors in c++ are the "resource acquisiton is initialization" that Bjarne Stroustrup writes about. The designs are compact, easy to understand, and solid.
For example, define a class as a LockHolder. The constructor acquires the lock; the destructor releases the lock. In Java there would have to be a method to release the lock. With destructors, the lock would be released when the block that constructed the object was exited.
Without dtors, the developer is requred to add one or more calls to the release function. Try/Catches tend to increase the required number of calls to release. Miss a call in the program and there is a problem. It may not be a memory leak, but just as bad.
With dtors and proper class design, the resulting code is cleaner and more robust.
 
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