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Manager is leaving--what to do?

 
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Hi Folks,
I have a terrible manager but he is finally leaving. Before he left, he made sure he put me on a crummy project but he says that he'll put my name on a new project coming up sometime soon. He had said this before about another project, but he later started trashing my skills.
In the past he didn't like me and would give my projects to his 2 favs. Stupid me, I figured that he would change since he's moving under management he once hated. He is still trashing my work and does not seem to recognize the work that I do. How can I make sure that my name is on the "list" as he says? Should I ask to see the list? I don't want to be forgotten since new management(a very nice person I've heard) is taking over. I am thinking of sending an email to the new management and expressing my interest in the project as well as forwarding my resume. In this way, I won't be forgotten for sure.
I know this not the best time to be looking for another job, but I am. I'm very unhappy where I am, and I've tried looking into other depts. But they are hiring left and right for outsiders.
 
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life is too short to spend any time being unhappy.
sort out the situation, only you know how.
 
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As she is posting the question on this site one would assume that she does not know what to do and would like some friendly advice.
 
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That's not the way women operate.
A new manager sounds like it could be your ship coming in. Then again the new broom sweeps clean.
It's often nice to see your old boss getting screwed, is there any chance management does not care for him/her either?
 
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Originally posted by Cheryl Gray:
Hi Folks,
I have a terrible manager but he is finally leaving. Before he left, he made sure he put me on a crummy project but he says that he'll put my name on a new project coming up sometime soon. He had said this before about another project, but he later started trashing my skills.
In the past he didn't like me and would give my projects to his 2 favs. Stupid me, I figured that he would change since he's moving under management he once hated. He is still trashing my work and does not seem to recognize the work that I do. How can I make sure that my name is on the "list" as he says? Should I ask to see the list? I don't want to be forgotten since new management(a very nice person I've heard) is taking over. I am thinking of sending an email to the new management and expressing my interest in the project as well as forwarding my resume. In this way, I won't be forgotten for sure.
I know this not the best time to be looking for another job, but I am. I'm very unhappy where I am, and I've tried looking into other depts. But they are hiring left and right for outsiders.


Hi Cheryl,
Do you have a name of the new manager? Invite him or her out to breakfast or lunch before that individual ever get the foot into the department. Executives and upper management do that all the times, try to do that if is not too much inconvenient. The cardinal rule to remember never hit the falling enemy. If he or she refuse, at least you will be remember as classy one.
The company hire outsider before spend the time searching for insider talent is odd. But play the game out until you see the US white collar labor market sign of improvement.
Good Lucks,
MCao
 
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The answer is simple, talk with the new manager. I like the idea of inviting him or her to breakfast or lunch. No matter in what context meet with this person and do the following:
1) Introduce yourself, meaning talk about what skills you have.
2) Cover your history; go over what you've done at the compny.
3) Discuss personal goals.
This last point is key. Talk about where you want your career to go, and how you can continrbute to the divisions projects as you get there. That's different then just saying "I want to do foo;" you need to align his goals with yours.
I had this very same problem on my first non-academic job. My first manager was a nice guy, but wasn't doing much for my career. He left a senior guy who had only been hired two months before took over. Over a fooseball game he and I started talking. I mentioned how I felt my skills were stagnating on the current project and what I hoped to do. I aldo told him how my prior manager had promised a salary review 6 months prior which never happened. He got me a new project and gave me a huge raise.
Like most things is business. This is just an issue of communication. Communicate your goals to your manager; he isn't a mind reader. If your manager won't listen to you, it's time to find someone who will listen, in this company or a new one.
--Mark
 
Cheryl Gray
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Yes, I was looking for advice and I really like the solutions suggested here. I will definitely try them out. I might also try and speak to the director and generate some more interest in the project. I'm also keeping my eyes open on outside jobs as well.
 
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