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Job market protection

 
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All series professions protect their jobs through professional organizations, education requirements. Other professions protect themselves with unions. All the rest who is not protected work for peanuts. The true it is easier to become IT professional then garbage collector. Having computer science degree helps but is not necessity and in fact large percentage of �IT professionals� have other degrees or have no degrees at all. Can you imagine becoming a lawyer with degree in astronomy? I never heard of an engineer working just for fun of doing it, in IT we have OpenSource. Somehow it becomes an honor and privilege to contribute free source code to some OpenSource project and at the same time doctors will let you die if you have not enough money. Of course businesses are very happy about this state of affairs, but it can�t go like this forever.
 
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Originally posted by stara szkapa:
All series professions protect their jobs through professional organizations, education requirements. Other professions protect themselves with unions.


Right, like managers. Er, like writers. No, wait, like consultants. Oh no, I mean like event planners. Or maybe marketing professionals? Um, what about sales. I'm unaware of any professional organizations or education requirements in those fields. I'm sure they have some organizations, but then, we alread have IEEE and the like. None of those people necessarily work for peanuts.

Originally posted by stara szkapa:
I never heard of an engineer working just for fun of doing it, in IT we have OpenSource. Somehow it becomes an honor and privilege to contribute free source code to some OpenSource project and at the same time doctors will let you die if you have not enough money. Of course businesses are very happy about this state of affairs, but it can?t go like this forever.


I've heard of lots of engineers working for fun, other professionals too. They volunteer time to non-profits, to teach students and others, and they post advice in newsgroups adn web sites. We just are the most comfortable using tools allowing large progress through distributed work.
--Mark
 
stara szkapa
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I apologize for being not precise in my first post and let me clarify. IT is not profession nether is management, writing, consulting, sales and the like. This are merely occupations or trades. Professions are regulated by professional organizations which determine what are technical standards, etical standards, educational standards, determine who is licenced professional, and have the power to grant and revoke licences. I�m not saying IT should follow this model and become profession, and at this time I�m not interested in criticizing IT for not being a profession. All I want is to point to the fact that there are no forces like the professions have protecting job market and protecting people involved in IT.
[ August 01, 2003: Message edited by: stara szkapa ]
 
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Back in the mid '70s there was sort of a push by the Data Processing Managers Association (DPMA) to get people to certify as a CDP (Certified Data Processor) or CCP (Certified Computer Professional) and to get employers to only accept such people. It fell through. The DPMA went on a downslide during the '90s and has sinced merged with other organizations to form the AITP (aitp.org).
The local AITP chapter where I live (others around the state are similar) is a fraction of the size the old DPMA chapter was, because neither DPMA or AITP has proven much worth in helping people network into new jobs or in providing any unique and valuable service in regard to career improvement, and in today's culture, a place where sedentary white males can stand around and drink and BS isn't all that popular - even after adding nonwhites and females. At least not one that has pretensions of being a professional organization.
Writers have guilds and those guilds have some teeth because they grew up back when fewer disputes were resolved by lawyers and more were handled by brass knuckles. Virtually every profession has at least one organization it can call its own, though not all have colorful histories.
However they only way you can use a professional organization, guild, or union to gain advantage is if that organization has near-monopoly control over members of that profession. Offshoring can completely bypass that situation (unless you can form a world-wide organization).
 
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