Win a copy of Rust Web Development this week in the Other Languages forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Tim Cooke
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Ron McLeod
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
Sheriffs:
  • Junilu Lacar
  • Rob Spoor
  • Paul Clapham
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Holloway
  • Tim Moores
  • Jesse Silverman
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Al Hobbs
  • Piet Souris
  • Frits Walraven

Need career guidance...

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello!
I used to have a great job in the SF bay area as a web developer for which I was, I am sure, overpaid. The company no longer exists, and I moved to the mountains and had a baby. In about a year or so I would like to go back to work full time and I would like to prepare for that.
When I left the job I was just learning java and servlets. I had previously worked with Broadvision using javascript and I really liked the work, dynamic websites, very large ones, with large databases. In learning java, I wrote a small servlet to verify a credit card, very exciting for me! I was very overwhelmed by a lot of it, learning by cramming, just enough info to get it to work. We were using tomcat, and and so much went way over my head...I would really struggle if someone asked me to tell them what Tomcat is (I would like to learn how to describe what I can do as well as do it, ha ha).
I don't have a very strong understanding of what I was doing. Strange to intuitively do something that is so logical and technical. Like, I did a lot of stuff with sql, but I was always very timid about it. I took a course to learn sys admin for broadvision, but again, I am timid about what I know, it is not very solid, and so I avoided those tasks at work because I didn't want to make a fool of myself or damage something. I want to build from what I know and solidify it, make more connections between the bits and pieces. But I also want to take it to the next level. I think my role at my last job is kind of obsolete now, a glorified html programmer, some graphics.
Anyway, so I would like to pick up where I left off and continue to learn java, but I don't really know what to do with it and I feel that I need some sort of goal. I am intimidated, but yet still very confident about my ability to learn. I learn fast, but I am intimidated by how much there is to learn and I guess that is why I am trying to deliniate a path, to limit and focus. I want to to get the SCJP certification, and after that the SCWCD certification seems like the most logical choice, closest to what I was doing before.
But when I look at developer job postings now, there is SO MUCH that they list and I feel that it is very important that I round out my training and that is where I need some advice. It seems that the java certs will not be enough and I need some solid "accesories". Some things I want to learn so that I won't be intimidated by them any more, but I wondered if there was a sort of standard set I should learn. Like I see XML mentioned a lot in web developer job postings. And php, asp. What, typicaly, would a developer with the SCWCD cert be expected to also know?
Anyway, I think I've asked my question. I'm starting to babble like my son, ha!
Thanks
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 5093
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
job listings are not set in stone I've noticed.
The requirements are often more a wishlist than a firm requirement, and will list skills that are impossible to all aqcuire together at the age of the people they're looking for (or even in the timeframe all those techs have been on the market).
Having a well ballanced portfolio of skills is more important to land a good job. A good will let you exploit your strengths while making sure you have opportunity to work on reducing those weaknesses where possible within the project architecture.
EJB for example is nice and often listed as a requirement, but I've never used it and got asked for a lot of interviews where it was listed.
I do have some theoretical knowledge about it which helps, but IMO it's usually the wrong choice for a project (which doesn't always help...).
 
Hilary Pagliughi
Greenhorn
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for your answer.
One of my troubles is that I worry I am arrogant or over confident, but it seems to me, based on my experience, that if you've used javascript to build dynamic pages, then ASp ain't that different. I just did a freelance job for someone that required asp and VB, neither of which I'd used before, but I knew what to look for when trying to figure out how to use them. I knew what 'words' I needed. So from my point of view I don't think it matters what I know, cause I'm good at figuring the rest out, but boy, that sounds pretty lame in an interview! But it sounded great a few years ago!
After I posted I read a bunch of posts and felt pretty discouraged. The job market sounds so bad. But I guess you just have to do it cause you can really get into it and let the rest take care of itself. Worrying is just scarcity thinking. Better to have faith that there are enough jobs for everyone.
So I guess that's my answer, I should just focus on what interests me and learn good coding habits and be patient. I'm perfect for my perfect job, which just doesn't exist yet, cause I ain't ready for it!
That being said, I am still interested in input from others about what makes a good package of skills.
 
WHAT is your favorite color? Blue, no yellow, ahhhhhhh! Tiny ad:
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic