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Greenhorn
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Hello All,
I'm currently employed with a company that requires 70% travel that I don't like doing. I received an offer from another company, the salary is about the same but the benefits are not even close. I want to ask the comapny for three thousand more to cover some of the difference. Do you think this is a wise decision?

thanks in advance
Frank
 
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In general, asking for a raise you can justify is always reasonable. I think if you express to them your current situation, and how you want the extra money not out of greed, but can demonstrate the how it's only keeping you level, it's fine to ask. (I'm assuming your current compny benefits are reasonable, and not gold-plated, and that this new company's is way below average.)
--Mark
 
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I second Mark's opinion. It does bring up an interesting point regarding employment these days: long-term benefits in relation to long-term company employment. Recently, my company changed their benefit structure. Without going into detail, the benefits now tailor the new hires moreso than the long-term employees (e.g., an extra week of vacation usually given at 10 years is now given right away, while an extra week of vacation at 20 years is eliminated altogether). The trend I'm noticing is that companies are stealthfully moving away from having a lot of long-term employees to having more short-term employees (or maybe its just a few companies).
 
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I'm seeing benefits decreasing across the board (both direct pay and secondaries).
Asking the extra money might mean the talks will fail and you won't get the job, they can likely find someone else who DOES want to work for the lower pay.
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:
Asking the extra money might mean the talks will fail and you won't get the job


Realistically this is not a big concern. If their response is "how dare you ask for more--we don't want you," then it's probably not a company you want to be working for anyway. Ultimately they may say, "take it or leave it," and you may have to decide to take the lower pay. Some might see this as losing face, others would not.
--Mark
 
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