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The glass ceiling

 
Dyadya Volodya
Greenhorn
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Hi everyone,
I need a career advice. I seem to have hit an odd kind of a glass ceiling. I have become overqualified for all the developer positions I encounter(from the purely technical standpoint), yet my social skills, or the lack thereof, make me underqualified for any leadership role, such as a J2EE Architect. I do not mind coding, but I have trouble subordinating to the technical leadership less qualified than myself, and waste my time on jobs that are not challenging and where I don't get to learn anything new.
Where do I go? Who needs people like me? Surely someone has to! Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
[ October 25, 2003: Message edited by: Dyadya Volodya ]
 
Matt Cao
Ranch Hand
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Hi,
Become a "Geek Spy".
Regards,
MCao
 
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff
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Well, you have a few options.
First, you have recognized a deficency in your skill set, specifically along the lines of leadership (and I'm assuming teamwork). Many developers are lacking in this area, but few recognize it. You can work ot over it (and there are probably a few ways of doing this).
Second, you can work as a "specialist." Basically, you can become a consultant doing short term projects which require highly specialized technical skills. I know a few people like this, many focus on security which is a technically challenging field creating a high barrier to entry.
Third, you can go into R&D. In academia and some larger research labs people very often work independently. (They claim to do group work, but the reality is its very common--due to politics, interpersonal conflicts, and simply cultural reasons--for people to work fairly independently.)
Fourth, you can find a company which can make use of your skills. We had one guy like that at an old company of mine. He was probably the best developer I've ever seen. His work was brilliant, but I'd never show him to a client, or have him lead a team. We gave him projects that he could do which required minimal interaction with other team members. Come to think of it, we did this at another company of mine, and I've seen it in one or two other places I've interviewed with, so it seems faily common.
--Mark
 
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