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Economics as a minor - good or bad choice?

 
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Hello all
Im a computer science student in Europe, and because of the outsourcing
trend im considering to take some Economics courses instead of getting
more math courses (please note, that I do have introductory courses in
calculus, linear algebra, prob. theory and statistics) - is this a wise
choice - or should I continue to take math courses?
I plan primarily to choose courses conserning organization theory and managing theory - and therefor might be able to get a job as an IT manager/ project manager instead of a programmer.
Does this choice have any big disadvantages (eg. I will be rejectet if I want a position as a programmer, because I've also studied economics)
Thanks in advance for any "contributions"
- Svend Rost
 
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Hi,
Why is not Business Management as minor? Economic very hard to find a job because only a very large organization or government needs it. Yet, you have to be a top 10 graduated. I offer my observation from US perspective only.
Regards,
MCao
 
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Well, personally, I'm waiting for the day when economist's jobs follow the IT and Wall Street analyst jobs offshore just to see how they think offshoring's still a Good Thing when it happens to them.
But then I'm a mean, nasty spiteful creature. (drat, they exorcised the satanic graemlins)
 
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Originally posted by Svend Rost:
Hello all
Im a computer science student in Europe, and because of the outsourcing
trend im considering to take some Economics courses instead of getting
more math courses (please note, that I do have introductory courses in
calculus, linear algebra, prob. theory and statistics) - is this a wise
choice - or should I continue to take math courses?
I plan primarily to choose courses conserning organization theory and managing theory - and therefor might be able to get a job as an IT manager/ project manager instead of a programmer.
Does this choice have any big disadvantages (eg. I will be rejectet if I want a position as a programmer, because I've also studied economics)
Thanks in advance for any "contributions"
- Svend Rost


I took a BA in Economics back in the Dark Ages (eg 1982), and have found it to be a help in planning my career. I'd certainly agree that economics courses will be more valuable than Math courses. What you seem to be considering is actually closer to Business Management than classical Economics, though. And that is an excellent choice also.
 
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No one is going to hire you as a manager just because you took course A instead of course B (unless those courses add up to an MBA--even then, it's questionable if its really the courses which led to the hiring).
I recommend an economics for your because it is applied math. By that I mean, the math isn't going to help your career. I do software and I took advanced complexity theory classes. Realistically speaking, they are of no practical use to me. However, they, like all classes help develop problem solving skills. My personal opinion is that to this end, breadth is often more useful than depth for many people.
--Mark
 
Svend Rost
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Thanks all for the replies
Yes, most of the courses will be management minded, as I think they
will give me some qualifications that might give me an advantages over
other CS students. The courses will be taken at the institute of economics
though (which is why I wrote, minor in economics).
Im well aware of the fact, that no one will hire me as a manager because
I've taken x management courses - but by taking them I get first of all some
theoretical knowleadge and secondarly I can "prove" that I have knowleadge within the area of management / project management which might give me the upper hand if I am to compete with a CS. about a job as a project manager - I might be wrong though, as I dont have that much work expirience outside the univeristy.
 
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